Resource Spotlight: Oxford Handbooks Online

Handbooks are essential resources in the humanities, social sciences, and other academic areas. Oxford Handbooks Online, a new addition to SU Libraries’ collections, offers nearly 900 handbook titles published by Oxford University Press from 2004 to the present.

Each handbook offers a thorough introduction to research topics as well as a critical survey of the current state of scholarship in that field. Coverage spans sixteen disciplines, from music, history, and law to archaeology, political science, and religion. Content is browsable by discipline, title, and chapter, and all chapters are full-text searchable. External links to sources cited in the bibliographies of each chapter are included, facilitating easy access to the full text of other related sources.

Access is for an unlimited number of simultaneous users, so these titles are suitable for use as textbooks as well as for individual research. Each chapter is viewable in HTML or is downloadable as a PDF, and static URLs are available for posting in Blackboard reading lists.

Review:

Fisher, J. (2013). Oxford Handbooks Online. Choice, 50(11), 1980. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1400461290?accountid=14214

Digitalia Hispanica

To complement its growing print and digital collections, the Libraries have added Digitalia Hispanica, a global academic database of e-books and e-journals in Spanish, with access to thousands of sources from publishers such as Anthropos, Biblioteca Nueva, Calambur, El Ruedo Iberico. New publishers are being added each year. The comprehensive Spanish language collection contains a wide range of titles related to science, social science, history, philosophy, political science, art, literature, and linguistics.

Digitalia Hispanica includes journal coverage for titles such as Cuadernos de Estudios Gallegos, Hispanica, and Revista de Literatura.

The collection is searchable in Spanish or English. The texts can be read, downloaded,or listened to in Spanish or translated to English. The site is similar to Summon, offering many search options and filtering by the subject.

For further reading:

GOBI(R) Library Solutions from EBSCO Partners with Digitalia Hispanica to Provide Spanish E-Book Content through GOBI(R).” PRWeb Newswire 2 Feb. 2017. Business Insights: Essentials. Web. 9 Mar. 2018

Ann Skiold, Librarian for Fine Arts, Spanish and Italian Language and Literature.

Visual History Archive (USC Shoah Foundation and ProQuest)

In 1994, Steven Spielberg, director of the film “Schindler’s List,” established the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation at the University of Southern California (USC), with a goal to “record on videotape the testimonies of 50,000 survivors and other witnesses of the Holocaust from around the world for educational purposes before it was too late.” This initial undertaking was completed in 1999.

While most of the original 51,696 Holocaust testimonies in the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive came from Jewish Holocaust survivors, testimonies were also obtained from survivors of persecution against the Sinti and Roma (Gypsies), Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals, from survivors of Nazi eugenics policies, and from political prisoners and forced laborers, as well as from rescuers and aid providers, liberators, and participants in war crimes trials.  Subsequently, in keeping with the Shoah Foundation’s mission “to overcome prejudice, intolerance, and bigotry—and the suffering they cause—through the educational use of the Visual History Archive,” the Archive was expanded to include testimonies provided by eyewitnesses to a number of other genocides.

The Visual History Archive provides access to a fully streaming video collection of indexed primary-source testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides.  Within this archive, the largest of its kind, “history is preserved as told by the people who lived it,” and “the vast majority of the testimonies contain a complete personal history of life before, during, and after interviewees’ firsthand experience with genocide.”  (A supplementary feature enables the user to connect to contextual and related materials in other ProQuest databases.)

Total number of items: More than 54,400 video testimonies at an average of two hours each.

[Subcollections:] the European Holocaust, 1939-1945 (52,309 interviews); the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1923 (334 interviews); the Tutsi Genocide in Rwanda, 1994 (86 interviews); the Nanjing Massacre, 1937-1938 (30 interviews); the Guatemalan Genocide, 1978-1996 (10 interviews); and the Cambodian Genocide, 1975-1979 (5 interviews)]

  • Roughly 116,000 hours of film
  • Transcripts being added over time (initially over 900 German transcripts and almost 1,000 English transcripts)
  • Almost 65,000 index terms in English
  • Over 719,000 images (photographs, documents, works of art, artifacts from war, etc.)
  • 9 million names of family members and prominent figures
  • Roughly 49,000 location references
  • 2,500 recitations of literary works (poems, letters, diaries)
  • Over 2,100 musical recitals
  • Date range: 1915-1996
  • Geographic/language information: The filmed interviews were conducted in 63 countries in more than 40 different languages.  Over 27,000 testimonies are in English.

Examples of uses:  The Visual History Archive has served as a major resource for history and genealogy researchers, including individuals drawing on Archive content in producing dissertations and theses, publications, and documentary films.  In addition, curricula across a multiplicity of disciplines, in a variety of educational settings from secondary schools to colleges and universities, have made use of Visual History Archive material.  Examples of instructional use:

French Literature teaching example

Graphic Art teaching example

Additional information:

 

Lydia Wasylenko, Librarian for Citizenship and Humanities, Syracuse University Libraries

Resource Spotlight: Academic Video Online

Looking for streaming video?  Academic Video Online,  a recent addition to SU Libraries’ collections, offers over 63,000  streaming videos from  1889-2017 in a wide range of disciplines and subject areas, including  art and design, business, education, fashion, health sciences, history, politics as well as other  humanities, social sciences, and sciences areas.  Some videos are short and some full-length; genres include documentaries, news stories, television programs, interviews, animations, archival footage, instructional resources, and more.  Content is from a number of providers, including the BBC, Bloomberg, Microtraining, PBS, and Universal Pictures, to name a few.

Academic Video Online includes transcripts and options for creating clips and playlists.

This resource is one of several Alexander Street Press products to which SU libraries subscribes. Additional information, and tutorials, are available on the Alexander Street Press Academic Video Online (AVON) guide and the Alexander Street Press product site.

SU Libraries continues to develop video collections, and we welcome feedback regarding video content that will be useful to SU researchers.  Please send suggestions for the collection and comments to Tasha Cooper, Collection Development and Analysis Librarian, Syracuse University Libraries.

Review:

Griffin, D. (2014). Alexander Street Press: Academic video databases. Information Today, 31, 28. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1535262982?accountid=14214.

Resource Spotlight: Early European Books (EEB)

As Libraries collections grow in both electronic and print formats, much of what we collect represents the most current materials being released. You may not be aware, however, that we also build collections of historical material that have many applications for research and teaching.

In 2016, the Libraries purchased access to Early European Books from ProQuest, a collection of digitized works printed in Europe between 1450-1700. Materials emanate from the collections of the Danish Royal Library, the National Central Library in Florence, the National Library of France, the National Library of the Netherlands, and the Wellcome Library in London, the largest available collection of this nature.

The collection provides electronic, full-text access to thousands of books, including full page images, illustrations, and bindings.  The collection is also growing, as digitization efforts at other European institutions enable them to participate.

“Each item is captured in its entirety, complete with binding, edges, endpapers, blank pages and any loose inserts. The result is a wealth of information about the physical characteristics and histories of the original.”

EEB offers users a variety of advantages, among them:

  • the ability to locate early printed editions of works in their original languages;
  • opportunities to survey illustration, typography, and design practices in early European publishing, and;
  • access to the larger material aspects of the books included.

The collections can be searched broadly using keywords and bibliographic information, as well as by document features (illustrations, maps, printed marginalia, etc.) and by the library collections within which they appear. Individual books can be downloaded as pdfs or linked to in syllabi or course management systems.

Early European Books offers a continental complement to the hundreds of thousands of books available in Early English Books Online, which covers the same time period for books printed in England.

Reviews:

Magedanz, S. (2013). Early European Books. Choice, 51(1), 52. Retrieved from http://libezproxy.syr.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1442728483?accountid=14214

LaGuardia, C. (2010, April 1). Early European Books: printed sources to 1700, collection 1. Library Journal, 135(6), 96. Retrieved from http://libezproxy.syr.edu/login?url=http://bi.galegroup.com/essentials/article/GALE|A223749280?u=nysl_ce_syr&sid=summon

 

Contributed by: Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities