Syracuse University French Colloquium

Please join us for the 22nd Annual Syracuse University French Colloquium on Friday, April 12 from 9:30 a.m.–1 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library.

The French Colloquium provides the opportunity for graduates and undergraduates to share their recent research.

This event is sponsored and organized by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics with the assistance of the Syracuse University Libraries.

Schedule:

9:15 Breakfast
9:30 Colloquium Begins
9:30 – 10:30 Graduate Presentations

By Lylia Djoudi

Ninon Bartz

Nick Kouame

Amanda Parraguez

10:30 -10:45 Guest Presentation

By Barbara Opar

10:45 -11:00 Break
11:00 -11:30 Undergraduate Presentations
11:30 -12:00 Pi Delta Phi Induction
12:00-1:00 Lunch

SU Libraries and Partners to Host Living Library Event April 2

The Syracuse University Libraries will host a Living Library event on Tuesday, April 2 from noon to 5 p.m. in Bird Library. During this event, “living books” representing a wide range of cultural backgrounds and life experience will share their stories in conversation with individual “readers.” Based on previous popular Human Library events, the Living Library is an event that encourages people from different backgrounds to talk with and learn from each other in a safe and supportive environment. This event is typically held in April, the same month in which National Library Week occurs.

Living books—SU faculty, staff, and students from a variety of campus departments and programs as well as others from the local community—will engage in one-on-one conversations for 20 minutes at a time. Living books will share their experience on a variety of topics, including immigration, Zen practice, surviving abuse, cancer, and therapy dogs.

The event is offered in partnership with the Blackstone LaunchPad at Syracuse University, the Center for Learning and Student Success (CLASS), Disability Cultural Center, Hendricks Chapel, LGBT Resource Center, the Library and Information Science Student Association (LISSA) at the School of Information Studies, the Office of Learning Communities, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of Veteran and Military Affairs, and the Slutzker Center for International Services.

The Living Library is open to the campus community and no preregistration is required. However, participants can reserve some of our living books in advance for a specific time, if desired, by completing the form on this page by April 1: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/9040c4da8ad2eab9-syracuse. If you have difficulties using this form or wish to sign up via e-mail, please contact askasowi@syr.edu or tanantac@syr.edu.

This event is one of several Living Library events being planned throughout the region, with support from the Central NY Library Resources Council (CLRC).

For more information, visit http://researchguides.library.syr.edu/livinglibrary.

Celebrate Women’s History Month with distinguished SU alumna and author, Dr. Kimberly Townsend

The Blackstone LaunchPad powered by Techstars is celebrating Women’s History Month with a dynamic, speaker, Dr. Kimberly Townsend, who will share her story, along with lessons from her new book, Lifecircle Leadership: How Exceptional People Make Every Day Extraordinary, on Friday, March 22 at noon in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library.

The event is free and open to the entire campus community.

Dr. Townsend is an exceptional SU alumna, with four degrees — a BS in accounting and MBA from the Whitman School of Management, an executive masters of public administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and a JD from the Syracuse University College of Law.  She also holds a EdD from St. John Fisher College.

A prolific speaker and writer whose work has been published in industry journals and business publications, her book was released by Advantage Media Group in Fall, 2018.  In it, she explores how to increase the bottom line, and succeed personally and professionally, while making lives better for the people around us. Lifecircle Leadership is more than a leadership style, according to Dr. Townsend.  It is a philosophy based on how pragmatic altruism can make profound change.

Dr. Townsend worked her way from being a 35-year-old single mother with a high school diploma to President and CEO of a multi-million-dollar company.  She is a role model for anyone who wants to make positive change in the world. Like many women, she juggles the demands of family and the pressures of a full-time job as President & CEO of Loretto, while still finding time to volunteer and better the community.

Her personal story is inspiring.  Growing up in Windham, NH, near Boston, Dr. Townsend went to Boston University for two years before leaving school to marry and have a family. After several years as a stay-at-home mom, she decided it was time to act on her dream. Dr. Townsend went back to school in her early 30s. Her passion for learning led her to earn five degrees. She worked throughout her schooling, supporting her children, sometimes as a single mother. She has since remarried and is now a mother of six and grandmother of three.

Before joining Loretto, Dr. Townsend spent 13 years at Welch Allyn, a medical devices and software company, working her way from Attorney to Associate General Counsel to Senior Director of Government Affairs. Previous work includes positions at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and Ernst & Young LLP.  In addition to being an attorney admitted to the New York, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C. Bars, Dr. Townsend is a Certified Public Accountant and is SHRM-certified in Global Professional Human Resources. She was Adjunct Professor at Syracuse University from 2001-2011, and was the recipient of the 2010 President’s Award-Customer First at Welch Allyn, Inc.

Dr. Townsend is passionate about living a purposeful, connected life. She is driven by a deep desire to improve herself personally, her company, and her community, through her philosophy of Lifecircle Leadership and pragmatic altruism. She invites others to reconsider their approach to business and life, and hopes they discover, as she did, that being and doing good is good for business.

Refreshments will be served, and reservations are requested by e-mailing LaunchPad@syr.edu

Textile conservator Deborah Lee Trupin to give annual Brodsky Lecture on April 11 in Bird Library

Deborah Lee Trupin, textile and upholstery conservator, will give the lecture A Tale of Two Flags: How History of Treatment and Ownership Affected Conservation Treatment of Two Early Nineteenth-Century American Flags on Thursday, April 11, 2019 from 2:00–3:30 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library. The lecture will be preceded by an interactive workshop, Textile Identification, Inspection, and Recommendations for Proper Housing and Treatment, from 9:00 a.m. –12:00 p.m. in the Lemke Seminar Room, Special Collections Research Center, 6th floor, Bird Library.

The lecture and workshop are open to the public, however there is limited space available for the workshop; please RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu if you are interested in attending the workshop.

The event is the 2019 offering of the annual Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation. The series is endowed through a generous gift by William J. ’65, G’ 68 and Joan Brodsky ’67, G’68 of Chicago. Beginning in 2004, the endowment has been used to sponsor programs that promote and advance knowledge of library conservation theory, practice, and application among wide audiences, both on campus and in the region. Programs typically include lectures and workshops by prominent library conservators.

Between 1995 and 2006, Deborah Trupin led a team of textile conservators at the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) in the conservation treatment of two rare, early 19th-century flags: the 1809 Fort Niagara Garrison flag and the 1813 ‘Don’t give up the ship’ flag from the United States Naval Academy. Trupin’s lecture will address the treatment of these two historic flags, including cleaning, removal of past treatments, and preparation of these large textile objects for long-term exhibition. The interactive workshop will cover the basics of textile identification, agents of deterioration, care and storage, preventive conservation and collection management issues.

Deborah Trupin, principal of Trupin Conservation Services, has over 35 years of experience in textile conservation. From 1986 to 2015, she was Textile and Upholstery Conservator for the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation’s Bureau of Historic Sites (Peebles Island) in Waterford, NY, where she was responsible for the conservation of the textile and upholstery collections of the 35 state‑run historic sites, and supervised the New York State Battle Flag Preservation Project. She is an assistant adjunct professor in FIT’s Fashion and Textiles Studies MA program. Her main interests in conservation include preventive conservation, tapestries, upholstered furniture, flags, historic house museum issues, and the history of conservation/restoration. Trupin is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and serves on their Board.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available for this event. For more information, or if you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Julia Chambers at jschambe@syr.edu by March 27.

 

SU Libraries to Host Living Library Event April 2; Book Volunteers Needed

The Syracuse University Libraries are excited to host a Living Library event on Tuesday, April 2 from noon to 5 p.m. in Bird Library. Participants will have the opportunity to talk to “living books”—volunteers from the Syracuse University community who represent a variety of cultural backgrounds and life experiences. Living books will engage in conversation with participants in one-on-one or small group settings for 20 minutes at a time.

The event is open to the campus and community. No preregistration is required; however, there will be an opportunity to reserve a book for a specific time in advance, if desired.

Based on our previous popular Human Library events, the Living Library is an event that encourages people from different backgrounds to talk with and learn from each other in a safe and supportive environment. Previous topics have included Native American, Chinese, Indian, Nigerian, and Middle Eastern cultures; disability, queer, and biracial identities; military life; mental health issues; immigrant experiences; and experiencing homelessness. Volunteers and participants of past events have described conversations as rewarding, fun, important, and insightful.

Event organizers are currently seeking Syracuse University faculty, staff, and students, and other community members to serve as living books.  The deadline to complete an application form is Friday, March 8 (new deadline!).

This event is one of several Living Library events offered throughout the region, with support from the Central NY Library Resources Council (CLRC).