Mid-Century in Stereo 5.0 Exhibit

Two females from 1960s holding vinyl record

Mid-Century in Stereo 5.0 Exhibit

Check out the Learning Common’s newest exhibit on the 1st Floor of Bird Library: Mid-Century in Stereo 5.0, a selection of unusual vinyl records from a private collection culled from thrift stores and forgotten places. This year marks the fifth anniversary of the exhibit and consists of a handpicked selection of some of the best (of the worst) from previous years. Stop by the Learning Commons Information Desk to receive your free event-exclusive button. The exhibit begins May 16 and will run through June 30.

PlastiVan® Visits Syracuse University Libraries

Syracuse University Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center hosted a visit from the PlastiVan® on April 26, 2019.  The PlastiVan® is sponsored by SPE Foundation, an association of more than 22,000 members uniting plastics professionals worldwide and committed to making the plastics world better by providing a forum that generates awareness of issues facing the plastics community to identify solutions that will benefit everyone. The PlastiVan® program travels to schools and companies throughout North America, educating people of all ages about plastics chemistry, history, processing, manufacturing, sustainability and applications.

High school student sitting at table in library working beside Libraries curator

Institute of Technology at Syracuse Central student (left) works with Syracuse University Libraries’ Curator of Plastics and Historical Artifacts, Courtney Asztalos (right) during PlastiVan® field trip.

The PlastiVan® provided a unique field trip for forty local Syracuse high school students from the Institute of Technology at Syracuse Central. PlastiVan® CEO, Eve Vitale, delivered onsite PlastiVan® instruction sessions complete with hands on scientific experiments. Syracuse University Libraries’ Curator of Plastics and Historical Artifacts, Courtney Asztalos, provided one-hour sessions in the Lemke Room showcasing the Libraries’ historical plastics collections.

“The Libraries’ plastics collection is truly unique,” said Courtney Asztalos. “It provides an opportunity to unite chemistry, engineering and history. And the PlastiVan® program helps to spark that curiosity.”

“This is a great opportunity to provide experiential learning to high school students in the area,” said Dean David Seaman, Librarian and Dean of Syracuse University Libraries. “SU Libraries is committed to educating those in our campus and broader community.”

“The Phantom on Film: Routes of Cultural Transfer” a talk by Cormac Newark

Gaston Leroux’s Le Fantôme de l’Opéra (1909–10) may not be great literature, but it is a unique record of the most important social and artistic institution in the ‘capital of the nineteenth century’, Paris. More significant still, since the novel’s publication it has radically transcended that historical-geographical specificity and become the object of constant creative re-interpretation all over the world. Nowhere is this more compellingly illustrated than in the fifty-plus screen adaptations—silent films and talkies, horror films and musicals, cartoons and telenovelas and more—that have been made in places as far apart as Hollywood, Brazil and China between 1916 and today. In this talk, Cormac Newark (Guildhall School of Music & Drama) discusses a global interdisciplinary research project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, that he has led over the past three years to map the mechanisms and extraordinary extent of cultural transfer represented by the ‘Phantom on Film’ phenomenon. By way of a brief case-study, he will attempt to address the reasons why the Italian adaptations (1964–1998, by directors ranging from Dario Argento to Joe D’Amato) feature so much more sex than all the others.

The talk will be held on Monday, April 1st from 5:00 – 6:15 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library 114.

 

Syracuse University French Colloquium

Please join us for the 22nd Annual Syracuse University French Colloquium on Friday, April 12 from 9:30 a.m.–1 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library.

The French Colloquium provides the opportunity for graduates and undergraduates to share their recent research.

This event is sponsored and organized by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics with the assistance of the Syracuse University Libraries.

Schedule:

9:15 Breakfast
9:30 Colloquium Begins
9:30 – 10:30 Graduate Presentations

By Lylia Djoudi

Ninon Bartz

Nick Kouame

Amanda Parraguez

10:30 -10:45 Guest Presentation

By Barbara Opar

10:45 -11:00 Break
11:00 -11:30 Undergraduate Presentations
11:30 -12:00 Pi Delta Phi Induction
12:00-1:00 Lunch

Exhibit on Haitian writer and artist, Frankétienne in Bird Library, March 25-31

Syracuse University Libraries is pleased to help welcome the Haitian writer and artist,
Frankétienne, to campus. An exhibition of manuscripts and typewriting, first editions, pictures, and posters by or on this important artist and writer will be on display near the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons (PGSC) on the first floor of Bird Library from Monday, March 25th through Sunday, March 31st. This display is part of a larger set of campus events, including a talk by the artist on Monday, March 25th beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the PGSC. There will also be an exhibit of his paintings in the Community Folk Art Gallery. See: http://communityfolkartcenter.org/upcoming-events.html.

Before coming to Syracuse, Frankétienne will be in New York City on March 22nd and 23rd, to launch the English translation of his iconic Haitian Creole novel, Dézafi (1975), just published by the University of Virginia Press (https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/5164). His visit to Syracuse is from March 24th to 27th along with his translator, Dr. Asselin Charles, a retired professor of Comparative literature and writing.  Charles is best known for his English translation of De l’égalité des races humaines (The Equality of the Human Races).

To learn more about Frankétienne, please see the 2011 New York Times article at https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/30/world/americas/30haiti.html.