Mendeley workshops on Wednesday, February 21

Do you want to learn more about organizing your citations and PDFs in the research process? Please join the Syracuse University Libraries on Wednesday, February 21 for a Mendeley workshop. Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research. Both workshops will cover the same material and will be an introduction to new users but there will also be some advance tips and tricks for those of you who may already use the tool.

More help on the tool can be found on the Mendeley Research Guide.

Session 1:
Wednesday, February 21
10 to 11:30 a.m.
Bird Library 046 (ETC)

Session 2:
Wednesday, February 21
2:30 to 4 p.m.
Bird Library 046 (ETC)

Please register in advance of the workshop. Email Anne Rauh with questions.

Speed dating the research experts

Need help navigating the research process for your proposal, article, thesis, or dissertation? Come speed date with the research experts on Thursday, February 1 from 6-8 p.m. at the Inn Complete.

Get to know a variety of “research experts” specializing in library resources, research funding, copyright and author’s rights, data services, and more who can help guide you through the research process, from idea to publication.

Spots are available for the first 50 graduate students who register. Reserve your spot today at tinyurl.com/SU-Research-Experts.

This event is part of a graduate student series sponsored by ECS-GSO, SU Libraries, and ASEE.

Directing “Next to Normal” with Bob Hupp

Join Syracuse Stage Artistic Director Bob Hupp on Tuesday, January 30 at 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons in Bird Library to explore how he’s directing the current production of the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning musical drama “Next to Normal.”

At the center of this musical is a family at once familiar and recognizable, but also coping with its own particular dysfunction. Intimately told, Next to Normal “is a hard-hitting drama with amazing rock music,” says Hupp. Often funny and always poignant, it’s a work of grace and power that goes right to the human heart. The New York Times calls Next to Normal a “brave, breathtaking musical….”

This unique lecture and reception, which is open to the public, is co-produced by the College of Visual and Performing Arts and sponsored by the Library Associates of the Syracuse University Libraries.

Prior to joining Syracuse Stage, Hupp was the producing artistic director of the Arkansas Repertory Theater in Little Rock for 16 seasons. From 1989-1999, he was artistic director of the acclaimed Jean Cocteau Repertory in New York. Hupp also served on the board of the Theatre Communications Group, a nonprofit theatrical organization in New York, and has served as a panelist and on-site evaluator for the National Endowment for the Arts. He graduated from Dickinson College and completed a two-year certificate program at the National Shakespeare Conservatory in New York.

If you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Bianca Caiella Breed at bcaiella@syr.edu by January 23.

Next to Normal runs from January 24 to February 11, 2018 at Syracuse Stage. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit syracusestage.org or call the Box Office at 315.443.3275.

December 11-15 is “Food for Fines”

Donate food and reduce your library fines!

The libraries of SU and SUNY-ESF will once again be participating in “Food for Fines” from December 11-15 by collecting food for the needy and offering patrons the opportunity to reduce their overdue fines.

For each healthy, nonperishable food item donated by an individual during those dates, his/her regular, overdue circulation fines will be reduced by $1–Interlibrary loan fines and lost book fees are not included.

Participating libraries include Bird, the Carnegie Library, the SUCOL Library, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, the Architecture Reading Room, and ESF’s Moon Library.

Donations may be brought to the circulation desks of affiliated libraries. Students, faculty, and staff without current fines may also contribute.

All food items will be donated to the Food Bank of CNY.

For more information about “Food for Fines,” please contact Laura Benjamin at lmnemitz@syr.edu.

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Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities

Melissa Adler, assistant professor of information and media studies at the University of Western Ontario, will give the talk, Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities on Monday, December 4, 2017, from 5:15 to 6:30 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library. Her lecture is part of the Syracuse Symposium series on Belonging.

Systems of classification exist across every field, from biological taxonomies to library shelves. These systems reflect the values of their creators and exert power in defining relationships of belonging. Using classifications as primary historical texts and conceptualizing them as systems that organize state and cultural discourses, Adler will discuss some of the processes by which the marginalization of queer and racialized subjects becomes systemic, and ways that critical analysis reveals possibilities for organizing otherwise. Interdisciplinary fields, such as critical animal studies, disability studies, queer studies, and critical race studies are deeply invested in the critique and production of taxonomies and language, and while they share similar histories of oppression, their subjects push the limits of classifications in unique and compelling ways.

On Tuesday, December 5 from 9 a.m. to noon in 304 Tolley, Adler follows her public lecture with a focused workshop on how classification systems—from biological taxonomies to library organization systems—reflect the values of their creators and exert power, especially over marginalized subjects. This small-group discussion will focus on deconstructing social norms and taxonomies, as they pertain to LGBTQ communities. If you’d like to attend, please contact Rachel Clarke at rclark01@syr.edu by November 28, including any requests for accessibility accommodations.

These events are jointly sponsored by the Syracuse University Libraries and the School of Information Studies.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available for the lecture. If you need an accommodation to be able to fully participate in this event, please contact Patrick Williams at jpwill03@syr.edu by November 28.