POSIT presents: Contemporary Bibliography on March 27

Organizers of POSIT, a digital collection of architectural content compiled by students at the School of Architecture, are hosting an opening reception for its new series, entitled Contemporary Bibliography, on Tuesday, March 27 at 5:15 p.m. in the King + King Architecture Library.

Addressing the importance of having a variety of perspectives and inputs through previous works of practitioners, historians, and theorists, Contemporary Bibliography is a curated collection of influential resources that faculty have deemed important. Title pages of these books and magazine articles will be displayed in a bookcase outside of the King + King Architecture Library for the next several weeks.

During the reception, faculty members will comment on their reasons for suggesting certain titles. Refreshments will be served.

For more information, please contact Barbara Opar at baopar@syr.edu or at 315.443.3518.

 

 

In the Biblio Gallery: Sunyoung Lee

A mixed media exhibit entitled Stuffed Letter by Sunyoung Lee is currently on display in the Biblio Gallery on the 4th floor of Bird Library. Lee is a third year M.F.A. candidate in the Painting program at the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

In describing the exhibition, Lee says:

A human life is like a letter in an envelope. If a life is a huge, empty canvas, every bright moment can be considered a picturesque letter that contains colors, impressions, feelings. Like a letter, sealed in an envelope, it waits to be read by someone. My painting reveals my heart to the viewer; at the same time, it shows the viewer his or her own heart. Painting is a letter that performs the synthesis of all visual languages. These paintings were inspired by a literary work, but here that work is expressed without words. There are no letters, but one can feel the contents of letters. These paintings juxtapose content and form, meaning and meaninglessness, and signifier and signified to illustrate the contemporary human condition. Themes about humanity seem to be romantic, timeless, age-old relics. Post-modern art, arousing and instant, connects one with these themes. The zeitgeist (spirit of the times) yearns for a Renaissance (rebirth). It is this Renaissance that is needed for post-modern people who crave humanity.

The exhibit will be on display through May 13, 2018.

For more information about exhibiting in the Biblio Gallery, contact Ann Skiold at saskiold@syr.edu or see the Biblio Gallery website.

Libraries commemorate Women’s History Month

The month of March marks the national celebration of Women’s History Month. In commemoration, the SU Libraries are hosting a number of exhibits in our spaces. In addition to a book display on the first floor of Bird Library by and about women who persisted, other exhibits include:

  • Women’s suffrage exhibit: This exhibit, which commemorates the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State, can be found on the first floor of Bird Library. Currently on loan from the Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC), the exhibit will be rotating to other public and academic libraries in our region throughout the year.
  • “Forces of Nature” exhibit: These pop art style posters from the Perimeter Institute, commemorating pioneering women of science, can be found in the Carnegie Library. From two-time Noble Prize-winner Marie Curie to “The First Lady of Physics,” Chieng-Shiung Wu, these women have changed the world of science through their ground-breaking contributions and persistence.

For more information, contact outreach librarian Tarida Anantachai at tanantac@syr.edu.

Present Tense: Selections from “The A-Bomb and Humanity” exhibit on display in Bird Library

A new exhibition, entitled Present Tense: Selections from “The A-Bomb and Humanity”, has been installed near the 2nd floor landing in Bird Library. It corresponds to a recent campus visit by peace activist and storyteller, Ms. Keiko Ogura, a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

Using photographs and drawings, the exhibition depicts the reality of human suffering created when atomic bombs destroyed the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of WW II. Text posted below each panel provides an English translation or other contextual information.

The full set of panels was produced by a survivors’ (Hibakusha) organization in order to promote peace and move public opinion toward the elimination of nuclear weapons. One set was given to a University of Kentucky professor, who is the father of Diane Grimes, a faculty member in Communication and Rhetorical Studies.

Additional information can be found at:

The A-Bomb and Humanity  (includes all 40 panels): http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hidankyo/nihon/english/webgallery/01.html

Keiko Ogura: https://soa.syr.edu/live/profiles/576-keiko-ogura

Hiroshima survivor Keiko Ogura “That Day Now”: https://soa.syr.edu/live/events/584-hiroshima-survivor-keiko-ogura-that-day-now

The panels will be on display through December 15, 2017.

 

“Hemmed in by Nature” on display in Bird Library

Bird Library is currently displaying the sculpture “Hemmed in by Nature” by artist Mark Povinelli on the second floor atrium.

This work explores the relationship between the five classical senses—sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch—depicted within the sculpture, thus invoking broader modalities of perception. By viewing the sculpture at unique orientations a variety of images are visualized through the copper wire panels (the human face, birds, butterflies, Ganesha, etc.). Povinelli is interested in the intersection between the sciences and arts.

This piece was created while Povinelli was an artist in residence at Syracuse University Nancy Cantor Warehouse in 2006/2007. The residency focused on building the sculpture in-situ to connect the broader Syracuse arts community with the Syracuse University student body. Mark Povinelli is currently the Kenneth A. and Mary Ann Shaw Professor of Practice in Entrepreneurial Leadership in the College of Engineering and Computer Science and the Whitman School of Management.