New exhibition: Goudy @ Syracuse: A Legacy by Design

Frederic W. Goudy (left) receives his first honorary degree from Syracuse University in 1939, with dean M. Lyle Spencer of the School of Journalism. University Archives Photograph Collection.

The exhibition Goudy @ Syracuse: A Legacy by Design, will be on display in Bird Library’s 6th floor gallery through May 13, 2018. Curated by Andrew J. Saluti, with William T. La Moy, it tells the story of the preeminent American designer and typographer Frederic W. Goudy and his long connection to Syracuse University.

Through a selection of rare books, printed ephemera, and other archival materials, as well as original sketches and markups for the 2016 Sherman typeface design adopted for the University’s visual identity, this exhibition explores the impact and importance of the famed type designer and celebrates the strong historical ties and entwined legacy of Goudy and Syracuse University.

An opening reception will be held in conjunction with Orange Central on Thursday, October 5 from 4:30 – 6 p.m. on the 6th floor of Bird Library.

For more information, visit https://library.syr.edu/scrc/programs/exhibitions.

In the Biblio Gallery: SER2_BRICK by Joseph Turek

An exhibit by Joseph Turek comprised of works created by painting atop wax that is then melted away is currently on display in the Biblio Gallery on the 4th floor of Bird Library. Turek is an MFA candidate in the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University.

In describing the exhibition, Turek says:

Patterns of habit, routine, or schedules form trust. What happens when this breaks down? What does it look like when the cogs are not aligned? The hope for this work is that there is novelty to this experience of breakdown. The technique is unusual, and is deliberately against the original intention for the paint. The result yields conceptual and formal implications for the medium of paint and the image.

The exhibit will be on display through the end of December.

For more information about exhibiting in the Biblio Gallery, contact Ann Skiold at saskiold@syr.edu or see the Biblio Gallery website.

In the Biblio Gallery: CUSE Quest by Kaiyuan “Harold” Chen

An exhibit by Kaiyuan “Harold” Chen comprised of works on paper inspired by natural forms, creatures, textures, lightness, and darkness is currently on display in the Biblio Gallery on the 4th floor of Bird Library. Chen is a junior majoring in Industrial and Interaction Design and minoring in Painting.

In describing the exhibition, Chen says:

Working on paper is a traditional way of making art. It shows the hand of the artist visually and the personality of the artist mentally. The different textures of paper encourage and inspire me to continue my creative adventure in drawing and painting. Trying a wide range of mediums, such as charcoal, conte, sepia, sanguine, pastels, gouache, acrylic paints and oil paints opened up a whole new world of possibility to me. I encourage students to experiment with as many mediums as possible, enjoy the creative process of making art, and self-expressing.

The exhibit will be on display through the summer.

For more information about exhibiting in the Biblio Gallery, contact Ann Skiold at saskiold@syr.edu or see the Biblio Gallery website.

Libraries’ spring exhibition: You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place

Syracuse University Libraries’ spring exhibition, You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place, opens with a reception on April 20 from 4:30-6 p.m. in the gallery on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Through a selection of rare books, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, photographs, and other artifacts from Special Collections, this exhibition re-frames common notions and accepted definitions of what ‘place’ can be by connecting specifically to the Syracuse community: as in the geographical relevance of the Erie Canal, the conceptual destination of the Underground Railroad, or the student experience specific to Syracuse University.

The exhibit and reception is presented in collaboration with and partially sponsored by the Syracuse University Humanities Center as a part of the 2016 Syracuse Symposium on Place. It will remain on view through mid-August.

Also on view at the Goldstein Faculty Center, the Crouse Hinds Administrative building, and the Joseph I. Lubin House in New York City, is The Lost Spaces of Syracuse University, an exhibition exploring the evolution of Syracuse University’s many buildings and spaces over our 147-year history. From the University’s early years in an office building in downtown Syracuse, to the campus boom of the post-World War II era, and the current development of the Campus Framework, each of these periods of change has added to the list of the University’s “lost buildings.” This exhibition of materials and photographs from the University Archives showcases the legacy of some of these lost spaces.

In conjunction with the Libraries’ exhibit opening, Dr. Brice Nordquist (Writing Program) and Dr. Emily Stokes-Rees (Museum Studies) will present the results of their Delmas-funded Special Collections Research Center Faculty Fellows projects. In its inaugural year, the program provides stipends to selected faculty who incorporate the use of special collections in their classes and enable their students to handle, analyze, and interpret SCRC’s rich primary source materials.

Students in Nordquist’s Rhetorics of Futurity: Utopia, Sci-Fi and City Planning course engaged with materials from SU’s collections of utopian, science fiction, and city planning materials. Students in Stokes-Rees’s Ethnographic Curatorship course had a hands-on curatorial experience with plastics collections and developed a new installation for the Plastics Pioneers Reading Room, located on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

In the Biblio Gallery: Museum Views by Jack Honeysett

Jack Honeysett is a British artist and current MFA candidate in the sculpture program in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. He employs photography, video, sculpture, and performance in a practice with the recurring theme of history, subtly questioning the prevailing use of history and narrative as a means of legitimizing and reinforcing stereotypes.

Museum Views is a photographic series created while Honeysett attended VPA’s Turner Semester residency in LA. Funded through a gift from SU VPA alumna and Advisory Council member Marylyn Turner Klaus ’56 G’57, the Turner Semester is a residency program for MFA students. The program allows the students to experience the arts of the West Coast and to live and work in San Pedro (the Los Angeles Harbor area) during the fall and spring semesters.

The composition of the photos draws attention not only to the pieces on display within the museum, but also to the display systems and the relationships between pieces created through the curation of the space. The experience of the space is presented as equal to the museum objects and the sense of art history which they imbue.

The pieces are hung in groups of three. The image on the right sets up the emphasis of the series, directing the viewer’s eye to the museum display. The other images expand on this and playfully explore the relationships between the viewer, display method, and piece. Installing this series in a library context is an experiment to see what parallels may be drawn between both museum and library’s role of cataloguing knowledge.

For more information about exhibiting in the Biblio Gallery, contact Ann Skiold at saskiold@syr.edu or see the Biblio Gallery website.