New resources recently added to Libraries’ collections

Syracuse University Libraries now provides access to the Music Magazine Archive, a joint collaboration of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Bowling Green State University along with NA Publishing and Reveal Digital. The Music Magazine Archive is a collection of mainstream and underground American music publications primarily from the 1960’s-1990’s representing popular culture, music journalism, and social and political transition. Collections include rock and folk (currently active), with hip-hop/rap due in late fall 2017. Publications are presented in full-color page-image scans, including articles, covers, advertisements, and reviews.

Additional new resources include:

For additional information on accessing these resources, please use the Ask Us! page or contact your subject librarian. To suggest a new resource to the Libraries, use the Suggest a Title form.

Libraries’ spring exhibition: You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place

Syracuse University Libraries’ spring exhibition, You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place, opens with a reception on April 20 from 4:30-6 p.m. in the gallery on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Through a selection of rare books, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, photographs, and other artifacts from Special Collections, this exhibition re-frames common notions and accepted definitions of what ‘place’ can be by connecting specifically to the Syracuse community: as in the geographical relevance of the Erie Canal, the conceptual destination of the Underground Railroad, or the student experience specific to Syracuse University.

The exhibit and reception is presented in collaboration with and partially sponsored by the Syracuse University Humanities Center as a part of the 2016 Syracuse Symposium on Place. It will remain on view through mid-August.

Also on view at the Goldstein Faculty Center, the Crouse Hinds Administrative building, and the Joseph I. Lubin House in New York City, is The Lost Spaces of Syracuse University, an exhibition exploring the evolution of Syracuse University’s many buildings and spaces over our 147-year history. From the University’s early years in an office building in downtown Syracuse, to the campus boom of the post-World War II era, and the current development of the Campus Framework, each of these periods of change has added to the list of the University’s “lost buildings.” This exhibition of materials and photographs from the University Archives showcases the legacy of some of these lost spaces.

In conjunction with the Libraries’ exhibit opening, Dr. Brice Nordquist (Writing Program) and Dr. Emily Stokes-Rees (Museum Studies) will present the results of their Delmas-funded Special Collections Research Center Faculty Fellows projects. In its inaugural year, the program provides stipends to selected faculty who incorporate the use of special collections in their classes and enable their students to handle, analyze, and interpret SCRC’s rich primary source materials.

Students in Nordquist’s Rhetorics of Futurity: Utopia, Sci-Fi and City Planning course engaged with materials from SU’s collections of utopian, science fiction, and city planning materials. Students in Stokes-Rees’s Ethnographic Curatorship course had a hands-on curatorial experience with plastics collections and developed a new installation for the Plastics Pioneers Reading Room, located on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

SBIR/STTR federal grant opportunities workshop on April 21

Learn how to access over $2 billion in annual grant opportunities. The Blackstone LaunchPad is sponsoring a SBIR/STTR Federal Grant Opportunities workshop on April 21 from 1–3:30 p.m., in the Blackstone LaunchPad and Peter Graham Scholarly Commons on the first floor Bird Library.

Each year, 11 federal agencies set aside more than $2 billion to fund research and development at small businesses, through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program.

Federal agencies issue solicitations to small companies, including start-ups, for research and product development.

Come to this workshop to learn more about SBIR and STTR programs and if they could be a tool to fund your ideas for innovation in research and new product development. Marcene Sonneborn, Professor of Practice in the School of Information Studies, and SBIR & Innovation Specialist for the CNY Technology Development Organization, will lead the workshop.

Sponsored by the Blackstone LaunchPad at Syracuse University the workshop is open to the campus and community.

What you will learn:

  • Overview of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) programs.
  • How small businesses, manufacturers, and entrepreneurs can tap into over $2 billion in federal funding for grants and contracts to develop innovative products and services.

Who should attend:

  • Entrepreneurs seeking to start a technology business.
  • University researchers wishing to explore partnering with small businesses with a goal of commercializing University research/technology.
  • Phase I award winners planning a Phase II proposal.
  • Past Phase I applicants who have not yet won an award.

SBIR proposals are two times more likely to be funded when small businesses collaborate with a university or research institution. Find out how to make those connections at this campus-community information exchange.

Informational materials will also be provided by the Syracuse University Office of Technology Transfer.

For more details or to register, email LaunchPad@syr.edu.

Syracuse University Press awarded NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book grant

Syracuse University Press, a division of Syracuse University Libraries, is one of eight institutions to be awarded a grant in the Humanities Open Book Program, jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant program will make outstanding out-of-print humanities books available to a wide audience by recreating them as open access ebooks.

“NEH provides support for projects across America that preserve our heritage, promote scholarly discoveries, and make the best of America’s humanities ideas available to all Americans,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “We are proud to announce this latest group of grantees who, through their projects and research, will bring valuable lessons of history and culture to Americans.”

“We are delighted that Syracuse University has received this grant, which supports core library values such as open access to scholarship and quality academic publishing,” said Dean of Libraries David Seaman.  SU Press will digitize 23 titles from its Irish Studies and New York State series. The new ebooks will be available through multiple platforms, including Project MUSE Open and Syracuse University’s SURFACE repository.

“Syracuse University Press welcomes this opportunity to make available digital editions of widely-reviewed and cited early histories of New York State, along with noteworthy books from our Irish Studies series that remain relevant to today’s scholars and students,” said Alice Randel Pfeiffer, director of Syracuse University Press.

“We are honored and grateful to the NEH for this chance to bring important books of humanistic interest back into conversation with current scholarship, and to make them openly available to a global community of readers,” said Suzanne E. Guiod, editor-in-chief of the Press. “Significantly, this grant will allow us to further our collaboration with Syracuse University Libraries in developing Syracuse Unbound, our joint open access publishing initiative.”

“This award presents an outstanding opportunity for SU Press to resurface and vivify important works from its prestigious backlist, said Terry Ehling, associate director of Project MUSE. “Project MUSE looks forward to working with the Press to ensure that these books are discoverable, usable, and potentially transformative to scholars now and in the future.”

ABOUT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY PRESS

Syracuse University Press was founded in 1943 by Chancellor William Pearson Tolley as a means to publish and disseminate scholarly research and to extend Syracuse University’s reach and academic reputation. The Press has gained national and international acclaim by publishing award-winning and ground-breaking books. With more than 1,700 titles in print, the Press supports the central mission of the University to teach, to support research initiatives, and to disseminate scholarship. The Press also prides itself on publishing carefully edited and beautifully designed books that enhance the intellectual life of general readers.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

This project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this resource do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Libraries and Partners to Host Annual Human Library Event

The Syracuse University Libraries will host the fourth annual Human Library event on Wednesday, April 5, from noon to 4 p.m. in Bird Library, in partnership with the Library and Information Science Student Association at the School of Information Studies, the Office of Learning Communities and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

During this event, human books from the SU community representing a wide range of cultural backgrounds, areas of expertise and life experiences will share their stories in conversation with individual “readers.” The event is intended to encourage diversity and challenge stereotypes and prejudices.

Human books—SU faculty, staff and students from a variety of campus departments and programs—will engage in one-on-one or small group conversations for 20 minutes at a time. Examples of human books include individuals from Iran, Kazakhstan, Italy and China; a member of the Onondaga Nation; and a first generation Portuguese-American. Other books will discuss topics such mental illness, physical disabilities and navigating one’s personal identity in light of socio-political events.

The event is open to the campus community and no preregistration is required. However, participants can reserve a book in advance for a specific time, if desired, by completing the form on this page: http://researchguides.library.syr.edu/humanlibrary/reserve.

SU’s event is part of a regional Human Library program taking place during April, the month in which National Library Week is celebrated, supported by the Central NY Library Resources Council. The first Human Library program was held in 2000 in Copenhagen, Denmark (see http://www.humanlibrary.org). Since then, similar events have been organized in libraries, schools and other institutions around the world.

For more information, see http://researchguides.library.syr.edu/humanlibrary.

 

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