New resources recently added to Libraries’ collections

Syracuse University Libraries now provides access to the Music Magazine Archive, a joint collaboration of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Bowling Green State University along with NA Publishing and Reveal Digital. The Music Magazine Archive is a collection of mainstream and underground American music publications primarily from the 1960’s-1990’s representing popular culture, music journalism, and social and political transition. Collections include rock and folk (currently active), with hip-hop/rap due in late fall 2017. Publications are presented in full-color page-image scans, including articles, covers, advertisements, and reviews.

Additional new resources include:

For additional information on accessing these resources, please use the Ask Us! page or contact your subject librarian. To suggest a new resource to the Libraries, use the Suggest a Title form.

New resources recently added to Libraries’ collections

New ebooks offered by the Libraries include:

Also, the Libraries now offer online access to the journal Academy of Management Discoveries.

For additional information on accessing these resources, please use the Ask Us! page or contact your subject librarian. To suggest a new resource to the Libraries, use the Suggest a Title form.

New resources recently added to Libraries’ collections

New resources offered by the Libraries include:

Birkhauser Building Types Database provides access to works on architecture design, including articles, building plans, and photos.

Disability in the Modern World: History of a Social Movement provides a visual and textual history of disability in culture. Features video and pages of primary sources, including letters, documents, news stories, government and institutional documents, oral histories, interviews, documentaries and related archival materials.

Early European Books, from ProQuest, provides the most comprehensive digitized collection of rare books and incunabula available. It includes a wide survey of the print output of Europe from 1450-1700, providing access to more than 45,000 titles. ProQuest is building Early European Books in partnership with major European libraries, including the National Library of France, the National Library of Florence, the National Library of the Netherlands, the Wellcome Library, London, and the Royal Library, Denmark.

NK News Pro is a research platform focusing on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea). Includes proprietary and open source information on DPRK companies and trade, a DPRK experts list, economic indicators, import/export data and ship movements, leadership biographies, long form research analysis, and archives of KCNR (“Korean Central News Agency”) television news. Aggregates hundreds of news, think-tank, blog, and academic sources known for reliable DPRK coverage.

PrivCo provides access to business and financial information about private companies. Search for private companies, private market investors, venture capital funding deals, private mergers and acquisitions, and private equity deals. Includes a knowledge bank of terms and concepts related to the private market.

Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States (SHELDUS) is a data set providing county-level information about natural hazard events from 1960 to present, compiled by the Hazards & Vulnerability and Research Institute at the University of South Carolina.

For additional information on accessing these resources, please use the Ask Us! page or contact your subject librarian. To suggest a new resource to the Libraries, use the Suggest a Title form.

Interested in Pursuing Humanities Funding and Fellowships?

humanities-center-profile-pic-sliderFaculty and graduate students are invited to learn more about a range of University resources for pursuing Humanities grants, fellowships, and awards.

Friday, October 21
9:30 to 11 a.m.
Tolley Humanities Building, Room 304 (Sainsbury Library)

In this workshop we will cover:

  • Using “Pivot” for tailored / curated searches
  • Using “Grants Advisor” to identify humanities funding
  • Other guides to funding in the humanities and interpretive social sciences
  • Research support from SU Librarian specialists in the Humanities

Specialized staff from the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Libraries will introduce these tools and engage in Q&A with participants. Coffee and light breakfast available. Download the flier to post or share with interested colleagues.

Hosted by the Humanities Center, this event is supported by the Office for Research, OSP and the Syracuse University Libraries.

Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum lecture and workshop with Emily Drabinski

Emily DrabinskiAs a part of the Syracuse University Libraries’ ongoing Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum series, Emily Drabinski, Coordinator of Library Instruction at Long Island University, Brooklyn will be on campus at the end of September for a lecture and workshop.

Co-sponsored by the Graduate School, a public lecture entitled, “We Are What We Do: Labor and Knowledge in Open Access” will take place on Thursday, September 29 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library.

While librarians and scholars in other disciplines often share commitments to open access publishing, the shape those commitments take is determined in part by our relative positions in the knowledge economy. Librarians buy information and are thus intimately familiar with the commodification of knowledge. Faculty outside the library have vested interests in sharing their ideas, but rarely understand the political economy that makes their texts circulate. Drawing on her experience flipping the journal Radical Teacher to an open access model, Drabinski will discuss the implications of these different standpoints for sustainable open access publishing.

Co-sponsored by Women in Science and Engineering at Syracuse University, a workshop with Drabinski, “Teaching the Critical Catalog: Using Metadata to Trouble the World,” will take place on Friday, September 30 from 9:30 a.m.–noon in Bird Library, Room 004. Space is limited to the first 40 registrants. Register at https://goo.gl/tUuRBV.

In their attempts to confine and control the world’s knowledge, library classification and cataloging schemes inevitably describe ideologically constructed worlds. From Melvil Dewey’s deeply Christian universe to the ordering of perversions in the Library of Congress, libraries inevitably reflect the biases of the people who create them. In this workshop, participants will begin to read classification texts critically to see what and how certain ideas—and not others—are produced and reproduced in our catalogs and on our shelves. As teachers, we will also explore how to deploy these critical perspectives as useful tools for students who use library collections to make knowledge of their own.

Emily Drabinski is Coordinator of Library Instruction at Long Island University, Brooklyn. She sits on the board of Radical Teacher, a journal of socialist, feminist, and anti-racist teaching practice, and edits Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, a book series from Library Juice Press/Litwin Books.

The Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum seeks to explore how scholars in different fields engage digital technologies as the subject matter of their research, in their research methods, their collaborative work, and the systems through which their research is disseminated and preserved. It also explores the ways in which the libraries, the university, and our technology infrastructure can support these modes of scholarship and sustain their future.

 

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