Historian Woody Register to present book talk, signing, and seminar on The Muckers

muckersHistorian Woody Register will give a talk and reading from his book, The Muckers: A Narrative of the Crapshooters Club, on Thursday, March 2, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. in the Hillyer Room on the 6th floor of Bird Library. Dr. Register will also give a seminar on March 3 from 10 a.m. – noon on working with archives and how he uncovered this historic find.

Published by Syracuse University Press, The Muckers is a first-person account of a young 19th– century gang member in New York City. Dr. Register discovered the manuscript while conducting research in the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries. The original manuscript was written by William Osborne Dapping, who would go on to become a respected Central New York journalist, winning a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of a 1929 prison riot for The Auburn, N.Y., Citizen-Advertiser.

Woody Register is chair of the Department of History and Francis S. Houghteling Professor of American History at the University of the South (Sewanee), where he also directs the American Studies Program. Additional information on The Muckers can be found in this Syracuse University Press blog post, and an excerpt is available in this article in Syracuse University Magazine.‌

The lecture is open to the public, however there is limited space available for the seminar; RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu.

Listening Party at the Belfer Audio Archive on February 16

cylinder-group-shot-twoEver wondered what goes on behind the doors of the Belfer Audio Archive? Join the audio engineers, media archivists, and curators of the Special Collections Research Center to explore the impressive work being done to preserve the history of recorded sound. The Belfer Listening Party will take place on Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 4:30–6:00 p.m. in the Belfer Audio Archive and Preservation Laboratory, located adjacent to Bird Library on the east side of the building.

A selection of recently preserved holdings, including rare and unique interviews, examples of early 20th-century popular music, and recordings of important political and pop culture figures will be played. You are invited to enjoy light fare and refreshments while you learn more about the vast collections maintained at one of the most revered audio preservation laboratories in the country. The playlist will include samples from:

The Mike Wallace Papers: The Mike Wallace Papers consists of transcripts and audio recordings of interviews with a wide variety of personalities, including authors, entertainers, religious leaders, political figures, and more.

Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade: Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade (8 August 1857 – 13 April 1944) was a French composer and pianist. We were recently able to acquire two recordings of Mme Chaminade playing two of her own pieces (Les Sylvains and L’Enjoleuse). These recordings were recorded in 1901 and are exceptional examples of the acoustic era of recording.

Sugar, Alcohol, Meat – The Dial-A-Poem Poets: Recorded between 1975-1980 in New York City, this two album set features poetry and spoken word performances by Patti Smith, William S. Burroughs, John Cage, Allen Ginsberg, Andrei Voznesensky, and many others.

Martin Luther King: “The American Dream”:  A 1968 Southeastern Recording Company of America recording, presents Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Speech at Syracuse University. With introduction by Wyatt T. Walker, Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Special Collections Research Center plays central role in University’s new graphic identity

goudy-sherman_1The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is pleased to announce that Syracuse University’s new branding utilizes a Goudy-inspired typeface derived from original materials in the Special Collections Research Center (SCRC).

William La Moy, curator of rare books and manuscripts in the SCRC, has spent the last several years researching the deep relationship between Syracuse University and revered American printer and designer Frederic Goudy. La Moy’s research revealed an important piece of University history and, ultimately, led to a distinctive new typeface to represent the University.

In 1934, Syracuse University School of Journalism Dean M. Lyle Spencer knew of Goudy’s importance and thought it would be a good idea for the new journalism program to form an association with an important American type designer. Spencer approached Goudy, who lived in the Hudson Valley, and he became interested in the fledgling program. Along with being asked to join the faculty and become a consultant, Goudy was awarded a medal for typographic excellence by the journalism school and given an honorary degree.

Recently, as the University looked to enhance its brand identity, in collaboration with New York City design firm Pentagram, designers exploring the University’s history visited the Special Collections Research Center to view Goudy’s Sherman typeface. The typeface was gifted to the University by Goudy’s niece and is largely unknown, having been used only in a few private press publications in the 1910s. The metal type has been housed in and safeguarded by SU Libraries for decades. “It is not only beautiful, but it has the lightness, the serviceability, and the range to serve a broad spectrum of publishing needs,” explains La Moy.

“Typography plays such a central role in branded communications,” says Rob Rayfield, executive director of digital and creative services in the University’s Office of Marketing and Communications. “Its effect and the impression it carries requires careful consideration when identifying a font to align with an institution’s identity. Sherman seemed to be patiently waiting in our archives to emerge and fill the role it’s so perfectly suited for at Syracuse University.”

“The Special Collections Research Center is delighted to contribute to Syracuse University’s new visual identity,” says senior director Lucy Mulroney. “The use of unique historical collections for the creation of a distinctive new typeface for the University speaks to our mission to support scholarship, creativity, and entrepreneurial endeavors.”

Chief Curator Andrew Saluti is currently developing an exhibition with La Moy that will highlight the University’s history with Goudy, his impact on typography, and his legacy as embodied in the University’s new typeface. The exhibition is planned to open in fall 2017 in the Special Collections Research Center in Bird Library.

Syracuse University, in partnership with Pentagram and production company DressCode, created a brief documentary video on the creation of the new typeface. “Goudy and Syracuse: The Tale of a Typeface Found” features La Moy, Michael Bierut of Pentagram, and type designer Chester Jenkins of Brooklyn, co-founder of Village Type.

Syracuse University has also issued a news story about the discovery, Hidden Treasure in Special Collections Embodies Syracuse University Spirit, written by Kathleen Haley.

Libraries’ fall exhibition: Our Doors Opened Wide: Syracuse University and the GI Bill, 1945-1950

10-0861Syracuse University Libraries’ fall exhibition, Our Doors Opened Wide: Syracuse University and the GI Bill, 1945-1950, will open on September 15, 2016 in Bird Library. Curated by University Archivist Meg Mason, the exhibition explores the dramatic impact of the GI Bill and the subsequent influx of veterans on the Syracuse University campus following World War II (1945-1950).

Between 1945 and 1950, the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, commonly known as the GI Bill, supported some 2.3 million students nationwide. Few universities in the country were more closely identified with the GI Bill than Syracuse University. Chancellor William Tolley promised servicemen and women that there would be places waiting for them at the University when they returned, and enrollment more than tripled in the years immediately after the war. Although still a small university by national standards, Syracuse ranked first in New York State and 17th in the country in veteran enrollment.

The exhibition features an array of materials from University Archives that document this critical period in the University’s history and the associated changes to the campus landscape, social and cultural life, and academic programs. Materials on view include:

  • photographs of temporary classrooms and housing for veterans, including old barracks and trailers, which filled the campus and surrounding areas;
  • cartoons of veteran student life on campus;
  • aerial shots of the main and south campuses showing changes in the landscape;
  • personal items from veterans who attended Syracuse University, including a cheerleading megaphone, a postcard about arriving at Syracuse, and photographs of the inside of one of the trailers used as married student housing;
  • Daily Orange articles about the impact of veterans on campus.

An opening reception will be held in conjunction with Orange Central on Thursday, September 15 from 4:30 – 6 p.m. on in the gallery on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

For more information, contact Syracuse University Archives at archives@syr.edu.

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Libraries’ spring exhibition, Avida Dollars: Salvador Dalí, Joseph Forêt, and the Three Most Expensive Books in the World, opens April 22

dali postcardThis exhibition, curated by Professor Emeritus Harold Jones, explores the collaboration between Salvador Dalí and Parisian publisher Joseph Forêt to produce “the three most expensive books in the world” between 1956 and 1963. These books are illustrated editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Saint John’s Apocalypse. The materials on view are from Professor Jones’s personal collection, which he has generously donated to the Special Collections Research Center.

A symposium, Lope de Vega and the Modern World, will also take place on April 22 from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons on the first floor of Bird Library. The event will honor Professor Jones and the 70th anniversary of Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Literatures. Featured speakers are Alejandro García-Reidy, Syracuse University; Fernando Plata, Colgate University; Veronika Ryjik, Franklin and Marshall College; Chad Leahy, University of Denver; and Javier Rubiera, University of Montreal.

A reception celebrating the exhibition opening and the symposium will be held on Friday, April 22 from 4 –5:30 p.m. in the Special Collections Research Center on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Harold Jones is professor emeritus of Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at Syracuse University. He joined Syracuse University in 1988, was chair of the department for nine years (1988–97), and served as program coordinator of Spanish for the following six years. His teaching and research interests include early modern Spanish poetry, drama, and Don Quixote.

 

 

Image of Salvador Dalí derived from an original work by Philippe Halsman.

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