Special Collections Research Center to host comic art events

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries, in conjunction with The Salt City Comic-Con, will host a special viewing of original comic art and a panel discussion on Friday, June 23, 2017 in Bird Library.

The one-day viewing will be held on the sixth floor of Bird Library from 10:00 a.m. to noon and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. It will feature selected original works by comic masters including Hal Foster (Prince Valiant), Frank Robbins (Johnny Hazard), Stan Drake (The Heart of Juliet Jones), Irwin Hasen (Dondi), and more. Casual fans, hard core collectors, and art historians are invited to view original comic and cartoon art from industry legends maintained in the Syracuse University collections.

The Friday evening panel discussion at 5:00 p.m. will be held in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons on the first floor of Bird Library. The panel will explore and discuss the many original comic art treasures in the collection. Panelists will include Craig Yoe, comic art historian and publisher, and Dan Herman, publisher of Hermes Press and also a well-regarded comics art historian.  Pop culture and marketing expert Ed Catto, of Bonfire Agency, will moderate the panel. These events will serve as “Salt City Comic-con eve” activities to celebrate the convention.

This event is free and open the public. Syracuse University’s Bird Library is located at 222 Waverly Avenue.  Door prizes will be awarded to random attendees of the panel discussion. Additional information on schedules, guests, tickets and cosplay can be found at www.SyracuseComicCon.com.

Salt City Comic-Con celebrates Geek Culture in Syracuse, the Finger Lakes, and all of Central New York. This growing convention, designed for both hardcore collectors and everyday pop-culture fans, stuffs myriad marvels into two action-packed days. Sponsorship and other inquiries can be directed to: SaltCityComicCon@gmail.com

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1957 JFK commencement speech at Syracuse University highlighted

Then-senator John F. Kennedy visited Syracuse University to give the commencement address in June 1957. That speech, which encouraged students to pursue careers in public service, has been the focus of news coverage in conjunction with the centennial of Kennedy’s birth on May 29.

University Archivist Meg Mason was featured in a story by Channel 9’s Jennifer Sanders:

http://www.localsyr.com/news/local-news/jfks-centenary-reflections-on-jfks-visit-to-syracuse-university/725567169

Veteran storyteller Sean Kirst wrote about the event for Syracuse University News:

https://news.syr.edu/2017/05/as-the-centennial-of-jfks-birth-nears-recalling-his-stirring-commencement-address-in-syracuse/

 

 

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Time Magazine highlights letter from William Safire collection

In honor of National Wine Day (May 25), Time Magazine highlighted a letter from the William Safire Papers housed in the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries.

The letter, from Julia Child to William Safire, was in response to one of his On Language columns in the New York Times that dealt with rules for capitalizing the names of wines.

Read the piece here: http://time.com/4680109/julia-child-william-safire-wine/

Libraries’ spring exhibition: You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place

Syracuse University Libraries’ spring exhibition, You Are Here: Expanding the Concept of Place, opens with a reception on April 20 from 4:30-6 p.m. in the gallery on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Through a selection of rare books, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, photographs, and other artifacts from Special Collections, this exhibition re-frames common notions and accepted definitions of what ‘place’ can be by connecting specifically to the Syracuse community: as in the geographical relevance of the Erie Canal, the conceptual destination of the Underground Railroad, or the student experience specific to Syracuse University.

The exhibit and reception is presented in collaboration with and partially sponsored by the Syracuse University Humanities Center as a part of the 2016 Syracuse Symposium on Place. It will remain on view through mid-August.

Also on view at the Goldstein Faculty Center, the Crouse Hinds Administrative building, and the Joseph I. Lubin House in New York City, is The Lost Spaces of Syracuse University, an exhibition exploring the evolution of Syracuse University’s many buildings and spaces over our 147-year history. From the University’s early years in an office building in downtown Syracuse, to the campus boom of the post-World War II era, and the current development of the Campus Framework, each of these periods of change has added to the list of the University’s “lost buildings.” This exhibition of materials and photographs from the University Archives showcases the legacy of some of these lost spaces.

In conjunction with the Libraries’ exhibit opening, Dr. Brice Nordquist (Writing Program) and Dr. Emily Stokes-Rees (Museum Studies) will present the results of their Delmas-funded Special Collections Research Center Faculty Fellows projects. In its inaugural year, the program provides stipends to selected faculty who incorporate the use of special collections in their classes and enable their students to handle, analyze, and interpret SCRC’s rich primary source materials.

Students in Nordquist’s Rhetorics of Futurity: Utopia, Sci-Fi and City Planning course engaged with materials from SU’s collections of utopian, science fiction, and city planning materials. Students in Stokes-Rees’s Ethnographic Curatorship course had a hands-on curatorial experience with plastics collections and developed a new installation for the Plastics Pioneers Reading Room, located on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Morgan Library’s Maria Fredericks to give annual Brodsky lecture, workshop on March 23 in Bird Library

maria-fredericksMaria Fredericks, Drue Heinz Book Conservator at the Morgan Library & Museum, will give the lecture Rare Books as Museum Objects: Considerations for Safe Exhibition and Loan on Thursday, March 23, 2017 from 4:30­–6 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons in Bird Library. The event is the 2017 offering in the annual Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation.

The lecture will be preceded by a hands-on workshop from 2 -3:3o p.m. in the Lemke Seminar Room, Special Collections Research Center, 6th floor. The workshop, Exploring Microclimates, will introduce participants to a variety of materials and techniques for providing a safe and stable environment for the exhibition, travel, and storage of artifacts. Ms. Fredericks will discuss the basics of sealed packages and monitoring devices for maintaining a stable relative humidity around artifacts in transit or on display, and the use of pollutant scavengers to mitigate the effects of certain indoor pollutants inside a display case or storage container.

The lecture is open to the public, however there is limited space available for the workshop; please RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu.

Maria Fredericks is the Drue Heinz Book Conservator in the Thaw Conservation Center of the Morgan Library & Museum. In addition to ongoing conservation treatment work and supervision of interns and post-graduate fellows, Ms. Fredericks devotes a substantial portion of her time to evaluating and preparing bound materials for display and travel in the Morgan’s exhibitions and loan program. She is also a visiting lecturer at NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, and is a frequent speaker and teacher. Before joining the staff of the Morgan in 2005, she was head of conservation at Columbia University Libraries. She has also held positions at the Huntington Library, the Winterthur Library, the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, and the Library of Congress.

The Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation combines a public lecture with a hands-on workshop. Supported by William J. (’65, G’68) and Joan (’67, G’68) Brodsky of Chicago, Illinois, the series offers programs that promote and advance knowledge of library conservation theory, practice, and application among wide audiences, both on campus and in the region.

 

Photo credit: Summer Olsen.