Morgan Library’s Maria Fredericks to give annual Brodsky lecture, workshop on March 23 in Bird Library

maria-fredericksMaria Fredericks, Drue Heinz Book Conservator at the Morgan Library & Museum, will give the lecture Rare Books as Museum Objects: Considerations for Safe Exhibition and Loan on Thursday, March 23, 2017 from 4:30­–6 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons in Bird Library. The event is the 2017 offering in the annual Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation.

The lecture will be preceded by a hands-on workshop from 2 -3:3o p.m. in the Lemke Seminar Room, Special Collections Research Center, 6th floor. The workshop, Exploring Microclimates, will introduce participants to a variety of materials and techniques for providing a safe and stable environment for the exhibition, travel, and storage of artifacts. Ms. Fredericks will discuss the basics of sealed packages and monitoring devices for maintaining a stable relative humidity around artifacts in transit or on display, and the use of pollutant scavengers to mitigate the effects of certain indoor pollutants inside a display case or storage container.

The lecture is open to the public, however there is limited space available for the workshop; please RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu.

Maria Fredericks is the Drue Heinz Book Conservator in the Thaw Conservation Center of the Morgan Library & Museum. In addition to ongoing conservation treatment work and supervision of interns and post-graduate fellows, Ms. Fredericks devotes a substantial portion of her time to evaluating and preparing bound materials for display and travel in the Morgan’s exhibitions and loan program. She is also a visiting lecturer at NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, and is a frequent speaker and teacher. Before joining the staff of the Morgan in 2005, she was head of conservation at Columbia University Libraries. She has also held positions at the Huntington Library, the Winterthur Library, the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, and the Library of Congress.

The Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation combines a public lecture with a hands-on workshop. Supported by William J. (’65, G’68) and Joan (’67, G’68) Brodsky of Chicago, Illinois, the series offers programs that promote and advance knowledge of library conservation theory, practice, and application among wide audiences, both on campus and in the region.

 

Photo credit: Summer Olsen.

Historian Woody Register to present book talk, signing, and seminar on The Muckers

muckersHistorian Woody Register will give a talk and reading from his book, The Muckers: A Narrative of the Crapshooters Club, on Thursday, March 2, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. in the Hillyer Room on the 6th floor of Bird Library. Dr. Register will also give a seminar on March 3 from 10 a.m. – noon on working with archives and how he uncovered this historic find.

Published by Syracuse University Press, The Muckers is a first-person account of a young 19th– century gang member in New York City. Dr. Register discovered the manuscript while conducting research in the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries. The original manuscript was written by William Osborne Dapping, who would go on to become a respected Central New York journalist, winning a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of a 1929 prison riot for The Auburn, N.Y., Citizen-Advertiser.

Woody Register is chair of the Department of History and Francis S. Houghteling Professor of American History at the University of the South (Sewanee), where he also directs the American Studies Program. Additional information on The Muckers can be found in this Syracuse University Press blog post, and an excerpt is available in this article in Syracuse University Magazine.‌

The lecture is open to the public, however there is limited space available for the seminar; RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu.

Listening Party at the Belfer Audio Archive on February 16

cylinder-group-shot-twoEver wondered what goes on behind the doors of the Belfer Audio Archive? Join the audio engineers, media archivists, and curators of the Special Collections Research Center to explore the impressive work being done to preserve the history of recorded sound. The Belfer Listening Party will take place on Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 4:30–6:00 p.m. in the Belfer Audio Archive and Preservation Laboratory, located adjacent to Bird Library on the east side of the building.

A selection of recently preserved holdings, including rare and unique interviews, examples of early 20th-century popular music, and recordings of important political and pop culture figures will be played. You are invited to enjoy light fare and refreshments while you learn more about the vast collections maintained at one of the most revered audio preservation laboratories in the country. The playlist will include samples from:

The Mike Wallace Papers: The Mike Wallace Papers consists of transcripts and audio recordings of interviews with a wide variety of personalities, including authors, entertainers, religious leaders, political figures, and more.

Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade: Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade (8 August 1857 – 13 April 1944) was a French composer and pianist. We were recently able to acquire two recordings of Mme Chaminade playing two of her own pieces (Les Sylvains and L’Enjoleuse). These recordings were recorded in 1901 and are exceptional examples of the acoustic era of recording.

Sugar, Alcohol, Meat – The Dial-A-Poem Poets: Recorded between 1975-1980 in New York City, this two album set features poetry and spoken word performances by Patti Smith, William S. Burroughs, John Cage, Allen Ginsberg, Andrei Voznesensky, and many others.

Martin Luther King: “The American Dream”:  A 1968 Southeastern Recording Company of America recording, presents Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Speech at Syracuse University. With introduction by Wyatt T. Walker, Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Libraries’ spring exhibition, Avida Dollars: Salvador Dalí, Joseph Forêt, and the Three Most Expensive Books in the World, opens April 22

dali postcardThis exhibition, curated by Professor Emeritus Harold Jones, explores the collaboration between Salvador Dalí and Parisian publisher Joseph Forêt to produce “the three most expensive books in the world” between 1956 and 1963. These books are illustrated editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Saint John’s Apocalypse. The materials on view are from Professor Jones’s personal collection, which he has generously donated to the Special Collections Research Center.

A symposium, Lope de Vega and the Modern World, will also take place on April 22 from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons on the first floor of Bird Library. The event will honor Professor Jones and the 70th anniversary of Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Literatures. Featured speakers are Alejandro García-Reidy, Syracuse University; Fernando Plata, Colgate University; Veronika Ryjik, Franklin and Marshall College; Chad Leahy, University of Denver; and Javier Rubiera, University of Montreal.

A reception celebrating the exhibition opening and the symposium will be held on Friday, April 22 from 4 –5:30 p.m. in the Special Collections Research Center on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Harold Jones is professor emeritus of Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at Syracuse University. He joined Syracuse University in 1988, was chair of the department for nine years (1988–97), and served as program coordinator of Spanish for the following six years. His teaching and research interests include early modern Spanish poetry, drama, and Don Quixote.

 

 

Image of Salvador Dalí derived from an original work by Philippe Halsman.

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Knowledge Crowns Those Who Hear Her: Sound Archives in the 21st Century: lecture and workshop with Sam Brylawski

Brylawski-smSyracuse University Libraries will present the annual lecture and workshop in the Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation on March 24-25, 2016. The featured presenter is Sam Brylawski, co-director of the American Discography Project at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The program, entitled “Knowledge Crowns Those Who Hear Her: Sound Archives in the 21st Century,” is in two parts.

A public lecture will take place on Thursday, March 24, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, room 114 Bird Library. A workshop will take place on Friday, March 25, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. in the Belfer Audio Archive, located adjacent to Bird Library. The workshop is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. To register, contact Barbara Brooker at bbbrooke@syr.edu or at 315.443.9763.

Sound archives in the United States are relatively new memory institutions. In fact, few are older than the Belfer Audio Archive, founded in 1963. The challenges facing all of them today are greater than ever before. In order to serve their constituencies, whether academic or public, managers of these collections are required to methodically acquire and preserve historical recordings before they are lost forever, and at the same time to navigate the relatively uncharted waters of born-digital audio that is never circulated in a physical format. Given these broad responsibilities, how can sound archives be sustained and best serve their constituencies? In fact, who are those constituencies? Sam Brylawski’s talk will briefly review the history of U.S. sound archives, and the challenges and opportunities they face today.

Sam Brylawski is the former head of the Library of Congress Recorded Sound Section. He is the co-author of the Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Plan (2012), the National Recording Preservation Board study on audio preservation, The State of Recorded Sound Preservation in the United States: A National Legacy at Risk in the Digital Age (2010), and The ARSC Guide to Audio Preservation (2015). He served as chair of the National Recording Preservation Board from 2013 to 2015. Mr. Brylawski is currently co-director of the American Discography Project at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and editor of UCSB’s Discography of American Historical Recordings (adp.library.ucsb.edu).