Directing “Next to Normal”

Join Syracuse Stage Artistic Director Bob Hupp on Tuesday, January 30 at 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons in Bird Library to explore how he’s directing the current production of the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning musical drama “Next to Normal.”

At the center of this musical is a family at once familiar and recognizable, but also coping with its own particular dysfunction. Intimately told, Next to Normal “is a hard-hitting drama with amazing rock music,” says Hupp. Often funny and always poignant, it’s a work of grace and power that goes right to the human heart. The New York Times calls Next to Normal a “brave, breathtaking musical….”

This unique lecture and reception, which is open to the public, is co-produced by the College of Visual and Performing Arts and sponsored by the Library Associates of the Syracuse University Libraries.

Prior to joining Syracuse Stage, Hupp was the producing artistic director of the Arkansas Repertory Theater in Little Rock for 16 seasons. From 1989-1999, he was artistic director of the acclaimed Jean Cocteau Repertory in New York. Hupp also served on the board of the Theatre Communications Group, a nonprofit theatrical organization in New York, and has served as a panelist and on-site evaluator for the National Endowment for the Arts. He graduated from Dickinson College and completed a two-year certificate program at the National Shakespeare Conservatory in New York.

If you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Bianca Caiella Breed at bcaiella@syr.edu by January 23.

Next to Normal runs from January 24 to February 11, 2018 at Syracuse Stage. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit syracusestage.org or call the Box Office at 315.443.3275.

Resource Spotlight: Academic Video Online

Looking for streaming video?  Academic Video Online,  a recent addition to SU Libraries’ collections, offers over 63,000  streaming videos from  1889-2017 in a wide range of disciplines and subject areas, including  art and design, business, education, fashion, health sciences, history, politics as well as other  humanities, social sciences, and sciences areas.  Some videos are short and some full-length; genres include documentaries, news stories, television programs, interviews, animations, archival footage, instructional resources, and more.  Content is from a number of providers, including the BBC, Bloomberg, Microtraining, PBS, and Universal Pictures, to name a few.

Academic Video Online includes transcripts and options for creating clips and playlists.

This resource is one of several Alexander Street Press products to which SU libraries subscribes. Additional information, and tutorials, are available on the Alexander Street Press Academic Video Online (AVON) guide and the Alexander Street Press product site.

SU Libraries continues to develop video collections, and we welcome feedback regarding video content that will be useful to SU researchers.  Please send suggestions for the collection and comments to Tasha Cooper, Collection Development and Analysis Librarian, Syracuse University Libraries.

Review:

Griffin, D. (2014). Alexander Street Press: Academic video databases. Information Today, 31, 28. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1535262982?accountid=14214.

Syracuse University Hult Prize winners announced

Student startups Farm to Flame Energy and Drop Top won first and second place respectively in the Syracuse campus qualifier for the prestigious Hult Prize, hosted by the Blackstone LaunchPad at Bird Library this week. Farm to Flame will now advance to one of 15 regional finals in March 2018, and first alternate, Drop Top, will move on to an open national competition, with another opportunity for a spot at the regionals.

A winning team from each of the 15 regional finals will be selected to participate in an eight-week summer residency at the Hult Castle accelerator in the United Kingdom, and a chance to pitch at the United Nations in September 2018, with the winning team receiving the $1,000,000 grand prize.

Farm to Flame Energy was founded by William Lee Mendes McKnight ’18, Arts and Sciences.  The venture partners with entrepreneurially-minded community members in developing countries to collaboratively design and develop micro-grid solutions, leveraging locally grown crops, to harness the power of energy and build more sustainable rural economies.

Farm to Flame Energy’s patented, smokeless, odorless, efficient bio-mass combustion system can be used for micro-grids and integrated with a cloud-based sensor system and data analysis for real-time monitoring. The team proposed a franchise model to achieve scalability, empowering community entrepreneurs and farmers in developing countries to become business partners. The model includes a strong agricultural education component, teaching local farmers how to plant high yield energy crops that are best suited for their climate and soils, which can be used as local biomass sources.

The model created by Farm to Flame Energy has the power to address Hult’s goal of impacting 10 million people by the year 2025, since it is estimated that 960 million people live in energy poverty in rural areas around the globe. “I am thrilled that our venture is gaining recognition, so that we can start bringing electricity to those who need it,” said McKnight, who is majoring in history and minoring in chemistry.  He is the son of Lee McKnight, associate professor in the iSchool.

Farm to Flame Energy team members include Kwaku Jyamfi ’18, a chemical engineering major in Engineering and Computer Science, and Sayje Lasenberry ’19, who is majoring in sustainable energy management at SUNY ESF.

Second place winner is Drop Top, with a concept to conserve water and enhance drip irrigation using REVLAR, a waterproof, tear-proof, durable, and impervious paper-thin material specifically designed to withstand high/low temperature fluctuations.  Drop Top’s ingenious design, made entirely of REVLAR, increases agricultural output while conserving water.  The venture also utilizes a franchise model to create scalability and help local farmers become entrepreneurs through education and empowerment.

Drop Top team members include Jason Kuperberg ’18, a biotechnology major in Arts and Sciences,  Serena DeSeta ’18, a dual major in entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises and advertising and business communication in Whitman, and Matthew Goodman ’19, a design major in Visual and Performing Arts (VPA).

Hult Prize Syracuse campus judges included:  Alejandro S Amezcua, Assistant Professor, Whitman School of Management; Karen Livingston, energy entrepreneur and senior business advisor, New York State Small Business Development Center; Joshua Aviv, founder, SparkCharge, and entrepreneur in residence, Falcone Center for Entrepreneurship; David Eihlers, innovation consultant, and former co-founder of Blue Highway, as well as adjunct faculty, MBA@SU; and Amanda Chou ’18, founding member and chief marketing officer of Thrive Projects. Thrive Projects was last year’s Syracuse campus Hult Prize winner, and went on to the regionals in Boston.

Ten teams pitched in the campus qualifier, receiving consistently high scores from the judges in a very tight competition.  The other eight teams included:  ComEnergy, led by Tyler Vartabedian (Engineering and Computer Science); Flow, led by Michael McCormack (Whitman); Flux, led by Nate Banks (Architecture); GiraTech, led by Teodoro DeLellis (Engineering and Computer Science); Inspire, led by Kayla Simon (Engineering and Computer Science) and Kutokea, led by Aaron Mwewa (Maxwell).

The Hult Prize, known as “The Nobel Prize for student startups,” seeks out game-changing student social enterprises that compete to solve the world’s toughest challenges.  This year’s theme, “Harnessing the Power of Energy,” issued a challenge to conceive a scalable solution to transform the lives of 10 million people by 2025.  Swedish billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist Bertil Hult established the competition in 2009. The Hult family donates $1,000,000 in seed capital annually to the winning social enterprise. Rutgers Business School students won last year’s grand prize for their solar-powered rickshaw, Roshni Rides, to reduce energy and encourage sustainable transportation in developing countries with large refugee populations.

Learn more at:  http://www.hultprize.org/

 

King Family gift supports Architecture Reading Room renovation, renaming

Russ and Joan “Jiggy” King

Dean of Libraries David Seaman and School of Architecture Dean Michael Speaks are pleased to announce a generous gift from Russell A. King ’52 and his late wife, Joan “Jiggy” King ’50 to create the King + King Architecture Library Endowed Support Fund. The gift is in celebration of the 150th anniversary of King + King Architects. Founded in 1868 by Archimedes Russell, King + King Architects is the oldest architectural firm in continuous practice in New York State and two years older than Syracuse University.

“We are delighted to have this support for the renovation and renaming of the Architecture Reading Room in Slocum Hall,” said Dean David Seaman. “It will give new life to an essential library resource in the daily lives of our architecture faculty and students.”

The gift will change the space dramatically, adding a technology-laden seminar space, a new circulation desk, a new HVAC system, and installation of updated library shelving. The fund also supports the space’s maintenance, collections, technology, and other needs through the creation of an endowment.

In recognition of the King’s generosity, the Reading Room will be renamed the King + King Architecture Library. The Library is slated to undergo renovation over the semester break in December 2017- January 2018. A grand opening of the space will occur during the spring semester of 2018.

“The story of the King + King Architects, as well as the King Family, is interwoven with the story of the Syracuse University and the School of Architecture,” said Dean Michael Speaks. “Indeed, you cannot tell one without the other. From the numerous projects the firm has completed on campus, to the six King family members who received a professional degree from the School, the two institutions are closely tied. We are thrilled for this bond to have a physical manifestation in the King + King Architecture Library. We give our deepest thanks to Russ and Jiggy King, as well as King + King Architects, for enabling this transformational project.”

With King + King Architects being two years older than Syracuse University, the two institutions have collaborated closely over the past 150 years. Notable campus projects where King + King served as architect include: Holden Observatory, Crouse College, Tolley Humanities Building, the Physics Building, Heroy Geology Laboratory, Manley Field House, and Bird Library. A full list of completed projects can be found below.

In addition, numerous members of the King Family are graduates of the Syracuse University School of Architecture. They are: Harry A. King 1924; F. Curtis King 1924; Russell A. King 1952; Peter G. King 1977; James R. King 1977; and Alex S. King 2011. The firm’s current CEO/managing partner, Kirk Narburgh, is a 1990 M.Arch graduate of the School and an adjunct professor. Peter King ’77 serves on the School of Architecture Advisory Board.

King + King Architects Projects on Syracuse University Campus

1887 – Holden Observatory

1889 – Crouse College

1889 – Von Ranke Library (Tolley)

1893 – Bastable Block

1949 – Physical Plant

1952 – Lowe Art Center (now part of Schine)

1952 – Shaw Hall

1953 – Hoople Buliding

1954 – Watson Hall

1954 – Marion Hall

1954 – White Hall

1954 – Link Hall

1955 – Haft Hall

1955 – Hinds Hall

1956 – Flint Hall

1958 – Regent Theatre Complex

1958 – Graham Dining Center

1959 – Day Hall

1959 – 804 University Avenue

1960 – Sadler Hall

 

1961 – Dellplain Hall

1961 – Manley Fieldhouse

1961 – Kimmel Hall

1963 – Biological Research

1963 – Booth Hall

1964 – Newhouse I

1964 – Haven Hall

1965 – Lawrinson Dormitory

1965 – Commissary

1967 – Physics Building

1968 – 621 Skytop

1970 – Link Hall

1972 – Heroy Geology Lab

1972 – Henry Health Center

1972 – Bird Library

2009 – Carmelo Anthony Basketball Center

2010 – Club 44

2016 – Chancellor’s Suite

2016 – Dellplain Residence Hall Renovations

 

December 11-15 is “Food for Fines”

Donate food and reduce your library fines!

The libraries of SU and SUNY-ESF will once again be participating in “Food for Fines” from December 11-15 by collecting food for the needy and offering patrons the opportunity to reduce their overdue fines.

For each healthy, nonperishable food item donated by an individual during those dates, his/her regular, overdue circulation fines will be reduced by $1–Interlibrary loan fines and lost book fees are not included.

Participating libraries include Bird, the Carnegie Library, the SUCOL Library, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, the Architecture Reading Room, and ESF’s Moon Library.

Donations may be brought to the circulation desks of affiliated libraries. Students, faculty, and staff without current fines may also contribute.

All food items will be donated to the Food Bank of CNY.

For more information about “Food for Fines,” please contact Laura Benjamin at lmnemitz@syr.edu.

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