Resource Spotlight: Academic Video Online

Looking for streaming video?  Academic Video Online,  a recent addition to SU Libraries’ collections, offers over 63,000  streaming videos from  1889-2017 in a wide range of disciplines and subject areas, including  art and design, business, education, fashion, health sciences, history, politics as well as other  humanities, social sciences, and sciences areas.  Some videos are short and some full-length; genres include documentaries, news stories, television programs, interviews, animations, archival footage, instructional resources, and more.  Content is from a number of providers, including the BBC, Bloomberg, Microtraining, PBS, and Universal Pictures, to name a few.

Academic Video Online includes transcripts and options for creating clips and playlists.

This resource is one of several Alexander Street Press products to which SU libraries subscribes. Additional information, and tutorials, are available on the Alexander Street Press Academic Video Online (AVON) guide and the Alexander Street Press product site.

SU Libraries continues to develop video collections, and we welcome feedback regarding video content that will be useful to SU researchers.  Please send suggestions for the collection and comments to Tasha Cooper, Collection Development and Analysis Librarian, Syracuse University Libraries.

Review:

Griffin, D. (2014). Alexander Street Press: Academic video databases. Information Today, 31, 28. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1535262982?accountid=14214.

King Family gift supports Architecture Reading Room renovation, renaming

Russ and Joan “Jiggy” King

Dean of Libraries David Seaman and School of Architecture Dean Michael Speaks are pleased to announce a generous gift from Russell A. King ’52 and his late wife, Joan “Jiggy” King ’50 to create the King + King Architecture Library Endowed Support Fund. The gift is in celebration of the 150th anniversary of King + King Architects. Founded in 1868 by Archimedes Russell, King + King Architects is the oldest architectural firm in continuous practice in New York State and two years older than Syracuse University.

“We are delighted to have this support for the renovation and renaming of the Architecture Reading Room in Slocum Hall,” said Dean David Seaman. “It will give new life to an essential library resource in the daily lives of our architecture faculty and students.”

The gift will change the space dramatically, adding a technology-laden seminar space, a new circulation desk, a new HVAC system, and installation of updated library shelving. The fund also supports the space’s maintenance, collections, technology, and other needs through the creation of an endowment.

In recognition of the King’s generosity, the Reading Room will be renamed the King + King Architecture Library. The Library is slated to undergo renovation over the semester break in December 2017- January 2018. A grand opening of the space will occur during the spring semester of 2018.

“The story of the King + King Architects, as well as the King Family, is interwoven with the story of the Syracuse University and the School of Architecture,” said Dean Michael Speaks. “Indeed, you cannot tell one without the other. From the numerous projects the firm has completed on campus, to the six King family members who received a professional degree from the School, the two institutions are closely tied. We are thrilled for this bond to have a physical manifestation in the King + King Architecture Library. We give our deepest thanks to Russ and Jiggy King, as well as King + King Architects, for enabling this transformational project.”

With King + King Architects being two years older than Syracuse University, the two institutions have collaborated closely over the past 150 years. Notable campus projects where King + King served as architect include: Holden Observatory, Crouse College, Tolley Humanities Building, the Physics Building, Heroy Geology Laboratory, Manley Field House, and Bird Library. A full list of completed projects can be found below.

In addition, numerous members of the King Family are graduates of the Syracuse University School of Architecture. They are: Harry A. King 1924; F. Curtis King 1924; Russell A. King 1952; Peter G. King 1977; James R. King 1977; and Alex S. King 2011. The firm’s current CEO/managing partner, Kirk Narburgh, is a 1990 M.Arch graduate of the School and an adjunct professor. Peter King ’77 serves on the School of Architecture Advisory Board.

King + King Architects Projects on Syracuse University Campus

1887 – Holden Observatory

1889 – Crouse College

1889 – Von Ranke Library (Tolley)

1893 – Bastable Block

1949 – Physical Plant

1952 – Lowe Art Center (now part of Schine)

1952 – Shaw Hall

1953 – Hoople Buliding

1954 – Watson Hall

1954 – Marion Hall

1954 – White Hall

1954 – Link Hall

1955 – Haft Hall

1955 – Hinds Hall

1956 – Flint Hall

1958 – Regent Theatre Complex

1958 – Graham Dining Center

1959 – Day Hall

1959 – 804 University Avenue

1960 – Sadler Hall

 

1961 – Dellplain Hall

1961 – Manley Fieldhouse

1961 – Kimmel Hall

1963 – Biological Research

1963 – Booth Hall

1964 – Newhouse I

1964 – Haven Hall

1965 – Lawrinson Dormitory

1965 – Commissary

1967 – Physics Building

1968 – 621 Skytop

1970 – Link Hall

1972 – Heroy Geology Lab

1972 – Henry Health Center

1972 – Bird Library

2009 – Carmelo Anthony Basketball Center

2010 – Club 44

2016 – Chancellor’s Suite

2016 – Dellplain Residence Hall Renovations

 

Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities

Melissa Adler, assistant professor of information and media studies at the University of Western Ontario, will give the talk, Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities on Monday, December 4, 2017, from 5:15 to 6:30 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library. Her lecture is part of the Syracuse Symposium series on Belonging.

Systems of classification exist across every field, from biological taxonomies to library shelves. These systems reflect the values of their creators and exert power in defining relationships of belonging. Using classifications as primary historical texts and conceptualizing them as systems that organize state and cultural discourses, Adler will discuss some of the processes by which the marginalization of queer and racialized subjects becomes systemic, and ways that critical analysis reveals possibilities for organizing otherwise. Interdisciplinary fields, such as critical animal studies, disability studies, queer studies, and critical race studies are deeply invested in the critique and production of taxonomies and language, and while they share similar histories of oppression, their subjects push the limits of classifications in unique and compelling ways.

On Tuesday, December 5 from 9 a.m. to noon in 304 Tolley, Adler follows her public lecture with a focused workshop on how classification systems—from biological taxonomies to library organization systems—reflect the values of their creators and exert power, especially over marginalized subjects. This small-group discussion will focus on deconstructing social norms and taxonomies, as they pertain to LGBTQ communities. If you’d like to attend, please contact Rachel Clarke at rclark01@syr.edu by November 28, including any requests for accessibility accommodations.

These events are jointly sponsored by the Syracuse University Libraries and the School of Information Studies.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available for the lecture. If you need an accommodation to be able to fully participate in this event, please contact Patrick Williams at jpwill03@syr.edu by November 28.

Resource Spotlight: Early European Books (EEB)

As Libraries collections grow in both electronic and print formats, much of what we collect represents the most current materials being released. You may not be aware, however, that we also build collections of historical material that have many applications for research and teaching.

In 2016, the Libraries purchased access to Early European Books from ProQuest, a collection of digitized works printed in Europe between 1450-1700. Materials emanate from the collections of the Danish Royal Library, the National Central Library in Florence, the National Library of France, the National Library of the Netherlands, and the Wellcome Library in London, the largest available collection of this nature.

The collection provides electronic, full-text access to thousands of books, including full page images, illustrations, and bindings.  The collection is also growing, as digitization efforts at other European institutions enable them to participate.

“Each item is captured in its entirety, complete with binding, edges, endpapers, blank pages and any loose inserts. The result is a wealth of information about the physical characteristics and histories of the original.”

EEB offers users a variety of advantages, among them:

  • the ability to locate early printed editions of works in their original languages;
  • opportunities to survey illustration, typography, and design practices in early European publishing, and;
  • access to the larger material aspects of the books included.

The collections can be searched broadly using keywords and bibliographic information, as well as by document features (illustrations, maps, printed marginalia, etc.) and by the library collections within which they appear. Individual books can be downloaded as pdfs or linked to in syllabi or course management systems.

Early European Books offers a continental complement to the hundreds of thousands of books available in Early English Books Online, which covers the same time period for books printed in England.

Reviews:

Magedanz, S. (2013). Early European Books. Choice, 51(1), 52. Retrieved from http://libezproxy.syr.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1442728483?accountid=14214

LaGuardia, C. (2010, April 1). Early European Books: printed sources to 1700, collection 1. Library Journal, 135(6), 96. Retrieved from http://libezproxy.syr.edu/login?url=http://bi.galegroup.com/essentials/article/GALE|A223749280?u=nysl_ce_syr&sid=summon

 

Contributed by: Patrick Williams, Librarian for Literature, Rhetoric, and Digital Humanities

Additional Resources for Review

Syracuse University Libraries welcomes feedback about the following resources for which we currently have trial access. Faculty, staff, and student feedback is an important part of our evaluation process and we welcome your comments, particularly about how a specific resource would support your research and/or the curriculum of your school or college. Send feedback to the collections team at colls@syr.edu. Please be aware that we are exploring these resources for future consideration, and there is no guarantee that we will be able to subscribe, especially within a specific timeframe.

Bloomsbury Food Library offers access to a broad and expanding range of encyclopedias, references works, e-books, images, and more. (Available through 11/29/17)

Gallup Analytics allows users to analyze, visualize, and export data from Gallup’s U.S. Daily tracking, World Poll and Social surveys. (Available through 11/18/17)

IBISWorld Procurement Research provides reports on suppliers, pricing, and negotiation for products and services, using Porter’s Five Forces and including a SWOT analysis in each report. Access is available on the existing IBISWorld platform. (Available through 11/09/17)

IMF eLibrary includes periodicals, books, working papers, studies, data, and statistical tools related to macroeconomics, globalization, development, trade and aid, technical assistance, demographics, emerging markets, policy advice, and poverty reduction. (Available through 11/18/17)

Marketline Advantage Tenders & Contracts is a module covering procurement and business intelligence database that has been temporarily activated within MarketLine Advantage. To access, selected databases and scroll down to Tenders & Contracts. (Available through 10/25/17)

Please note: Limited on-campus access to these resources are provided by the vendors for the purpose of evaluating their usefulness and potential value to the SU community. Please see the SU Libraries policy on access to licensed resources.