Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum lecture and workshop with Emily Drabinski

Emily DrabinskiAs a part of the Syracuse University Libraries’ ongoing Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum series, Emily Drabinski, Coordinator of Library Instruction at Long Island University, Brooklyn will be on campus at the end of September for a lecture and workshop.

Co-sponsored by the Graduate School, a public lecture entitled, “We Are What We Do: Labor and Knowledge in Open Access” will take place on Thursday, September 29 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library.

While librarians and scholars in other disciplines often share commitments to open access publishing, the shape those commitments take is determined in part by our relative positions in the knowledge economy. Librarians buy information and are thus intimately familiar with the commodification of knowledge. Faculty outside the library have vested interests in sharing their ideas, but rarely understand the political economy that makes their texts circulate. Drawing on her experience flipping the journal Radical Teacher to an open access model, Drabinski will discuss the implications of these different standpoints for sustainable open access publishing.

Co-sponsored by Women in Science and Engineering at Syracuse University, a workshop with Drabinski, “Teaching the Critical Catalog: Using Metadata to Trouble the World,” will take place on Friday, September 30 from 9:30 a.m.–noon in Bird Library, Room 004. Space is limited to the first 40 registrants. Register at https://goo.gl/tUuRBV.

In their attempts to confine and control the world’s knowledge, library classification and cataloging schemes inevitably describe ideologically constructed worlds. From Melvil Dewey’s deeply Christian universe to the ordering of perversions in the Library of Congress, libraries inevitably reflect the biases of the people who create them. In this workshop, participants will begin to read classification texts critically to see what and how certain ideas—and not others—are produced and reproduced in our catalogs and on our shelves. As teachers, we will also explore how to deploy these critical perspectives as useful tools for students who use library collections to make knowledge of their own.

Emily Drabinski is Coordinator of Library Instruction at Long Island University, Brooklyn. She sits on the board of Radical Teacher, a journal of socialist, feminist, and anti-racist teaching practice, and edits Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, a book series from Library Juice Press/Litwin Books.

The Issues in Digital Scholarship Forum seeks to explore how scholars in different fields engage digital technologies as the subject matter of their research, in their research methods, their collaborative work, and the systems through which their research is disseminated and preserved. It also explores the ways in which the libraries, the university, and our technology infrastructure can support these modes of scholarship and sustain their future.

 

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