Libraries Adds New Resources

Syracuse University Libraries has added the following new databases to its collections, which can be accessed using your net ID and password via library.syr.edu.

  • ForeignAffairs.com Articles and current news covering the political, historical, and economic impacts of American foreign policy and global affairs. Includes the full archive of Foreign Affairs Magazine 1922-present plus additional online-only content.
  • Psychotherapy.net Streaming video related to social work, psychotherapy, and counseling. Content created by Psychotherapy.net. Videos include counseling sessions and demonstrations, interviews, and other content for training mental health professionals. Browsable by therapeutic approach, issue, expert, and population.
  • SciFindern Articles, patents, and white papers describing chemicals. Includes information on structures, reactions, compounds, drug development, and manufacturing. Also includes PatentPak, MethodsNow Synthesis, and Retrosynthesis. Search by substances by name, CAS Registry Number, or use the editor to draw chemical structures, substructures, or reactions. Requires separate login. See SciFinder Research Guide for more help.
  • Tectonica Architectural design and construction information, including details about specific architectural projects. Note this resource is only accessible on-campus.
  • Late Qing and Republican-Era Chinese Newspapers  Newspapers from over twenty cities in China published between 1912 and 1949. This resource is the first of six open access global newspaper collections in the East View Global Press Archive. The Syracuse University Libraries provided monetary support for the open access series through a collaborative alliance of the Center for Research Libraries and East View.

New eBook & Journal Packages

Online Reference

Journals

For more information on collection development or to make suggestions, contact Anne Rauh, interim head of Collections and Research Services, at aerauh@syr.edu.



Lydia Wasylenko to Receive Syracuse University Libraries Assembly 2019 Distinguished Service Award

Lydia Wasylenko, librarian for Humanities and Citizenship, has been selected by the Syracuse University Libraries Assembly to receive the 2019 Distinguished Service Award. The award will be presented to Lydia at the Libraries’ annual holiday party on December 17, 2019 at 2 p.m. in Bird Library. Lydia was selected based on her contributions to the Libraries and the broader community, her service to the profession, and her excellence in professional skills.

The Distinguished Service Award has been presented to a deserving Libraries employee since 1990. It was started as a way for Libraries staff to recognize one of their peers. Nominations are open to all Libraries employees and include a recommendation from the person’s supervisor as well as at least two members of the University community.

As a subject librarian, Lydia’s service has been in various academic disciplines.  From economics to history to Slavic studies, Lydia has excelled in providing “superior reference and research consultation assistance to countless Syracuse University students and faculty.” Lydia has also provided her expertise behind the scenes in technical services, cataloging, and database management.

An important reason for Lydia’s receipt of this award is her ongoing connection with faculty members. One professor credited Lydia with helping her to “effectively create and teach new courses in my field,” noting that she has met with Lydia multiple times every semester for many years. Lydia’s dedication to meeting the needs of faculty are reflected in her outstanding work in collections development and her “ability to interact effectively and tactfully with a variety of different faculty personalities.”

Fellow librarians point to Lydia as “one of our more critically engaged colleagues,” having worked on the development and oversight of two different professional groups.  She has ably “represented the Libraries on the University Senate, engaging in the development of a number of key initiatives.” Outside of Syracuse University, Lydia has worked with organizations such as the DeWitt Community Library as a long-time board member “deeply involved in their selection of an architect and move to their Jamesville location.”  

Lydia is highly deserving of the Distinguished Service Award, “as a role model for any academic librarian, consistently contributing to organizational excellence.” As someone summarized, “there is something special about colleagues like Lydia, who do not bear the recognition of leadership … but forge ahead leading gently from within.”


Graduate Student Event Series Spring 2020

Syracuse University Libraries, with funding from the Graduate Student Organization, is hosting a series of events for graduate students in the spring 2020 semester at Bird Library. Registration is required for each workshop.

  • Speed Dating the Research Experts: Monday, February 17, 2020, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Room 114

Meet with SU librarians and campus research experts who can help you navigate your graduate program, while mingling with fellow graduate students over free food and drinks. Come chat and network with a variety of research experts within the libraries and on campus, who specialize in library resources, research funding, copyright and author’s rights, data services, and more. Limited to the first 60 registrants. Register at: https://syr.libwizard.com/f/speeddate.

  • Finding Funding & Grant Opportunities: Wednesday, March 4, 2020, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Room 004

Need money for your research? Grab dinner and join Christina Leigh Docteur (Director of Proposal Support Services in SU’s Office of Research), Simona Rosu (Associate Director, STEM Graduate Careers), and Emily Hart (Librarian for Science and Technology) to learn about SU’s resources for identifying funding opportunities. Bring your laptops and keywords in mind to describe your project needs (the who, what, why and how), and leave with navigation tips and potential opportunities. Limited to the first 40 registrants. Free food will be provided. Register at: https://syr.libwizard.com/f/graduateroundtable4.

  • Ready, Set, Publish!: Monday, April 6, 2020, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Room 114

Thinking about publishing your research? Join SU Librarians for a workshop to discuss topics including selecting high quality journals and identifying predatory journals, author rights, and copyright. Learn tips for responsible research conduct and maximizing your research impact. Limited to the first 40 registrants. Free food will be provided. Register at: https://syr.libwizard.com/f/readysetpublish


News E-Resource Feedback Requested

As part of its regular assessment of collections, Syracuse University Libraries invites feedback on a group of current news e-resources selected from the 600+ databases currently in our collections. Feedback is requested throughout the month of November.

Visit the resource feedback guide to explore news e-resources we are highlighting in November and provide feedback via the form located in the guide. Insight around how well the resource works, information contained within it, and how the resource is currently used is helpful in the Libraries’ evaluation.

Syracuse University Libraries develops the Libraries’ collections in a broad, interdisciplinary, and systematic way to maximize the Libraries’ holdings. The Libraries implement a three-pronged approach to collection development: 1) transformative collections that support “One University”  and provide faculty and students with competitive and comparable resources available at other Doctoral Universities with Very High Research Activity (R1); 2) responsive collections based on specific and direct requests from faculty and students to support teaching and learning; and 3) anticipatory collection development through the liaison librarian relationships and professional acumen, where librarians anticipate the teaching and research needs of the university and select resources to match. This three pronged approach allows the Libraries to build and prioritize collections that meet individual needs while improving the overall collection.

For more questions on SU Libraries collections, or to request additional resources, please contact our collection development team at colls@syr.edu


Lydia Wasylenko, Librarian, and Barry L. Wells Honored with SOURCE Awards

Photo of six people standing in Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Engagement including female Caucasian, male Caucasian, female Caucasian holding certificate, Asian male, female Caucasian, African american male
Left to Right: Cathryn Newton, Senior Advisor to the Chancellor and Provost for Faculty Engagement; Michael Wasylenko, Maxwell Advisory Board Professor of Economics; Lydia Wasylenko, Librarian for citizenship and humanities at Syracuse University Libraries; Junje “Rec” Ren ’20, Arts & Sciences major in Religion/Environment, Sustainability, and Policy who considers Lydia a valued mentor; Marissa Brown ’20, Arts & Sciences major in Biology and Neuroscience and SOURCE Student Research Mentor; Barry L. Wells, former Syracuse University Senior Vice President of Student Affairs and former Special Assistant to Chancellor Syverud, currently on the Transition Team for the SOURCE.

Syracuse University’s Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Engagement (SOURCE) presented Syracuse University librarian Lydia Wasylenko with a SOURCE Award named in her honor at a small reception held at SOURCE’s office at 238 Bird Library on Friday, September 27, 2019. The award was presented by Cathryn Newton, Senior Advisor to the Chancellor and Provost for Faculty Engagement, for Wasylenko’s pivotal role in researching and writing a study of undergraduate research at Syracuse University that led to the creation of SOURCE. Through the generosity of donors, SOURCE will be providing a grant in 2019 to support an undergraduate student conducting research in the Humanities or Social Sciences in Lydia Wasylenko’s name.

Lydia Wasylenko, librarian for citizenship and humanities at Syracuse University Libraries, served as recorder on the University’s Senate Committee on Research from 2010 through 2016. She co-authored a report on research opportunities for undergraduate students at Syracuse University, along with Professors Jamie L. Winders and Dinesh K. Gauri, in March 2015. That report helped to create SOURCE, a University-wide resource dedicated to undergraduate research.

The SOURCE grant in Wasylenko’s name will support a student whose work in the humanities or social sciences is driven by curiosity and a sustained commitment to excellence and is committed to depth of inquiry into the literature or archival materials. Applicants will follow the same guidelines to apply as for all other SOURCE Grants.

Wasylenko, female Caucasian, holding certificate, next to Ren, male Asian. Artwork on wall behind the two people
Left to Right: Lydia Wasylenko and Junje “Rec” Ren. Rec presented Lydia with the certificate.

Another award was named for Barry L. Wells, former Syracuse University Senior Vice President of Student Affairs and former Special Assistant to Chancellor Syverud, who is currently on the Transition Team for the SOURCE. That award will be given to a student in the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) fields and is driven by sustained commitment to scholarly/creative excellence and to inclusivity in all its dimensions, as well as long-term mentoring and deep personal investment in the careers and lives of others.   Wells began his career as inaugural coordinator of Syracuse University’s Office of Minority Affairs in 1976 and has been a committed leader in student and academic affairs, particularly dedicated to advancing principles of inclusion and diversity.

Student deadline to submit an application for these or other fall research awards is October 15.


Wordgathering, a Digital Open Access Journal of Work from Disabled Writers, Transitions to Publication at Syracuse University

three Caucasian females standing next to one another in front of shelf of books
From left to right, new Wordgathering publication team: Amanda Page, Open Publishing and Copyright Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries; Diane R. Wiener, Research Professor and Associate Director of BBI’s Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach; Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, Administrative Assistant of BBI’s Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach (missing from photo: Kate Deibel, Inclusion and Accessibility Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries)

Syracuse University’s Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) and Syracuse University Libraries will be assuming publication in December 2019 of the digital open access journal and website, Wordgathering: A Journal of Disability Poetry and Literature.  Diane R. Wiener, Research Professor and Associate Director of BBI’s Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach, will take over as Editor-in-Chief from Wordgathering’s founder and long-time editor, Michael Northen. Further support and advisement will come from Syracuse University colleagues Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, Administrative Assistant of BBI’s Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach; Amanda Page, Open Publishing and Copyright Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries; and Kate Deibel, Inclusion and Accessibility Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries. As part of this transition, the journal will be made fully Open Access over the course of the next several issues. Assuming responsibility of open access publication of Wordgathering aligns with the University’s goal of providing shared competency opportunities for students around ethics, integrity, and commitment to diversity and inclusion.

“As we celebrate disability awareness and appreciation month and open access week in October, it’s fitting that we celebrate this Wordgathering transition too,” said Diane Wiener. “Syracuse University Libraries’ Open Publishing Services supports publication of several journals, including Ergo, Excelsior, and Public. Adding Wordgathering to this portfolio is a natural extension,” said Amanda Page.

In an interview conducted by Professor Jim Ferris (Ability Center Endowed Chair in Disability Studies at the University of Toledo), the members of the Wordgathering transition team share additional details and background around the transition. Wordgathering was originally published in March 2007 to showcase the work of disabled poets. Later, audio versions were added to accompany the poems in text copy, enhance accessibility and increase readers’ aesthetic experience. The journal evolved to include poetry, essays, book reviews, interviews, fiction, art, excerpts, and other work from contributors with myriad disabilities, as well as work by nondisabled people. The journal provides diverse, cross-disability perspectives.

According to the current editor of Wordgathering, Michael Northen, “…Books by poets who actually wrote about their own disabilities in poetry prior to 2000, could literally be counted on one hand…for the first time [with the publishing of Wordgathering], the poets in my group saw their own lives reflected in the poetry they read.” Dr. Kate Deibel notes “Technology has certainly opened up opportunities for disabled creators to contribute their works. I’ll be working to ensure that can continue with Wordgathering, as well as ensuring that people of all abilities can read the content in the journal.”

Northen goes on to say that the transition of publication to Syracuse University will enable “the marvelous archive of disability writing published in Wordgathering over the past thirteen years [to] be preserved and accessible to any interested readers or researchers…[and] the available resources that Syracuse University has to offer. The journal, under Diane’s direction, and with advisement, sponsorship, and support from Syracuse University Libraries, the Burton Blatt Institute and others, will be able to expand and develop in directions that have not been possible up to this point.”

According to Wiener, “In thinking of disability arts and literature as facets of cultural diplomacy and communication, broadly, Wordgathering is well-situated…to engage actively in and be among the leaders of an ever-expansive discussion and demonstration of Disability, Deaf, Neurodivergent (including Autistic), Mad, and Crip poetics, in the world today.”

For more information, visit http://www.wordgathering.com/.


Libraries Seeking Collections Feedback

bookshelf filled with books
Bird Library Interior Books Shelves Racks

As part of its analysis, Syracuse University Libraries is exploring a number of new electronic resources throughout October 2019 for possible inclusion in its collection. The Libraries is seeking feedback from users on these trial resources. On-campus users are asked to visit the resource trials guide, explore the resources under consideration, and provide feedback on whichever resources tested via the embedded form on that guide page. Any insight users can provide on how well the proposed resource works, information contained within the resource, and how it might be useful is helpful in the Libraries’ evaluation. Note that access is limited to members of the Syracuse University community. Please see the SU Libraries policy on access to licensed resources.

Syracuse University Libraries develops the Libraries’ collections in a broad, interdisciplinary, and systematic way to maximize the Libraries’ holdings. The Libraries implement a three-pronged approach to collection development: 1) transformative collections that support a “One University”  and provide faculty and students with competitive and comparable resources available at other Doctoral Universities with Very High Research Activity (R1); 2) responsive collection based on specific and direct requests from faculty and students to support teaching and learning; and 3) anticipatory collection development through the liaison librarian relationships and professional acumen, where librarians anticipate the teaching and research needs of the university and select resources to match. This three pronged approach allows the Libraries to build and prioritize collections that meet individual needs while improving the overall collection.

Visit the resource trials guide.


Graduate Student Next Level Research Workshop and Discussion Forum

photo of Bird Library building with trees and grass in foregroundSyracuse University Libraries, in partnership with the Graduate Student Organization, is hosting “Next Level Research Workshop and Discussion Forum” in Bird Library on Saturday, November 9, 2019 from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The day-long workshop will support graduate students in the research or planning phase of their dissertation or thesis. Fellow graduate students and librarians will share strategies to enhance graduate research. Participants will learn how to locate new sources and identify places to find sources to expand bibliographies, discover strategies for managing sources, identify potential gaps in current research, and exchange ideas with other graduate students who are also in a similar phase in their research process.

The schedule and presentations will be customized based on the applications received and the needs identified. Potential topics could include, but are not limited to, advanced strategies for conducting literature reviews, citation and research organization strategies, locating the latest research on a topic, and refining research questions.

Space is limited to 30 registrants and application is required. There is no cost to participate. Acceptance to attend will be determined by the description of the applicant’s research project, their current stage of research (those in the research or planning phase of their dissertation or thesis), and identified needs.

The application can be found online at http://bit.ly/nextlevelresearch. For questions or more information, contact Emily Hart at ekhart@syr.edu.

The Next Level Research Workshop is the culmination event in a series of graduate student workshops co-sponsored by Syracuse University Libraries and the Syracuse University Graduate Student Organization. Registration is required for each workshop. The workshops are:

  • Library Tips & Tools for Successful Research
    Tuesday, Oct. 8, 5:30-7 p.m. in Bird Library 114
    Registration link
  • Survey, Data & Citation Management Tools
    Tuesday, Oct. 15, 5:30-7 p.m. in Bird Library 114
    Registration link
  • Information Literacy for Teaching Assistants
    Monday, Oct. 28, 5:30-7 p.m. in Bird Library 114
    Registration link

 


Libraries Piloting Data Purchase Program

Syracuse University Libraries’ department of Research & Scholarship is piloting a new data purchase program to support Syracuse University researchers, especially graduate students and newer assistant professors, in acquiring data. Applications for data requests, including numeric, text, or graphic data are being accepted now through October 31, 2019 via completion of an online form.

 

The goal of the data purchase program is to support research and the University’s shared competency around scientific inquiry and research skills. Datasets must cost less than $10,000 and be unrestricted, with preference given to requests that appeal to a broader University community or that can be used by more than one person.

 

“As an R1 research institution, the Libraries is committed to supporting academic research. In some instances, cost, licensing, technical or other issues inhibit a new researcher’s ability to move forward. This pilot is designed to remove barriers to generating new knowledge,” said David Seaman, Dean of Syracuse University Libraries, University Librarian and interim Dean of the School of Information Studies.

 

For more information or to apply for a data request, visit http://researchguides.library.syr.edu/dataservices/DataPurchase.