Digital Humanities Research Symposium, April 24

The Syracuse University Libraries is a co-sponsor of the Syracuse University’s Second Annual Digital Humanities Research Symposium taking place on Wednesday, April 24, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., in the Killian Room (Hall of Languages 500). This mini-conference is intended to highlight undergraduate and graduate students’ research in the Digital Humanities across an array of academic disciplines. Light breakfast and lunch will be provided and is open to the public. If you have questions or require accommodations, please contact Sarah Fuchs at sefuchss@syr.edu or Casarae Gibson at clgib100@syr.edu.


Studying Dante’s Religious Culture and the Problem of the Beatific Vision: Questions of Method, Lecture by Zygmunt G. Barański

In this lecture, Zygmunt G. Barański, Serena Professor of Italian Emeritus at the University of Cambridge and Notre Dame Professor of Dante & Italian Studies at the University of Notre Dame, will examine the unsystematic treatment of Dante’s religious culture in scholarship, with particular attention to the poet’s treatment of the issue of heavenly beatitude in the Commedias final canticle, Paradiso. Barański has published extensively on Dante and on medieval and modern Italian literature and culture. For many years he was senior editor of The Italianist, and currently holds the same position with Le tre corone.

A selection of materials from the Special Collections Research Center related to Dante’s works will be available to view before and after the talk.

For more information about the lecture, visit http://thecollege.syr.edu/event-items/PROGRAMS/2019.04.10-Baranski.html.

This event is co-sponsored by The English Department, the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Syracuse University Libraries, and the Syracuse University Humanities Center.

The lecture will be held at 5:00 p.m. in Bird Library, Spector Room, Bird 608. A reception will follow in the Hillyer Room, Bird 606.

To request accommodations, please contact aleone@syr.edu.


Textile conservator Deborah Lee Trupin to give annual Brodsky Lecture on April 11 in Bird Library

Deborah Lee Trupin, textile and upholstery conservator, will give the lecture A Tale of Two Flags: How History of Treatment and Ownership Affected Conservation Treatment of Two Early Nineteenth-Century American Flags on Thursday, April 11, 2019 from 2:00–3:30 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library. The lecture will be preceded by an interactive workshop, Textile Identification, Inspection, and Recommendations for Proper Housing and Treatment, from 9:00 a.m. –12:00 p.m. in the Lemke Seminar Room, Special Collections Research Center, 6th floor, Bird Library.

The lecture and workshop are open to the public, however there is limited space available for the workshop; please RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu if you are interested in attending the workshop.

The event is the 2019 offering of the annual Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation. The series is endowed through a generous gift by William J. ’65, G’ 68 and Joan Brodsky ’67, G’68 of Chicago. Beginning in 2004, the endowment has been used to sponsor programs that promote and advance knowledge of library conservation theory, practice, and application among wide audiences, both on campus and in the region. Programs typically include lectures and workshops by prominent library conservators.

Between 1995 and 2006, Deborah Trupin led a team of textile conservators at the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) in the conservation treatment of two rare, early 19th-century flags: the 1809 Fort Niagara Garrison flag and the 1813 ‘Don’t give up the ship’ flag from the United States Naval Academy. Trupin’s lecture will address the treatment of these two historic flags, including cleaning, removal of past treatments, and preparation of these large textile objects for long-term exhibition. The interactive workshop will cover the basics of textile identification, agents of deterioration, care and storage, preventive conservation and collection management issues.

Deborah Trupin, principal of Trupin Conservation Services, has over 35 years of experience in textile conservation. From 1986 to 2015, she was Textile and Upholstery Conservator for the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation’s Bureau of Historic Sites (Peebles Island) in Waterford, NY, where she was responsible for the conservation of the textile and upholstery collections of the 35 state‑run historic sites, and supervised the New York State Battle Flag Preservation Project. She is an assistant adjunct professor in FIT’s Fashion and Textiles Studies MA program. Her main interests in conservation include preventive conservation, tapestries, upholstered furniture, flags, historic house museum issues, and the history of conservation/restoration. Trupin is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and serves on their Board.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available for this event. For more information, or if you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Julia Chambers at jschambe@syr.edu by March 27.

 


What’s New in Special Collections? A selection of new acquisitions, recent donations and freshly available material from the Special Collections Research Center

The Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) at Syracuse University Libraries, home to many of Syracuse University’s rare or unique research and teaching collections, will hold a special viewing of recent acquisitions and newly available material on Thursday, February 7, from 4-6 p.m. in the Antje Bultmann Lemke Seminar Room on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

A selection of materials on display will include, but not limited to, an early 16th century palimpsest, an 18th century Mexican illuminated missal, examples from the newly processed papers and records of SU Chancellor William P. Tolley and newly-accessioned materials from the Pan Am 103 Archives. Staff will also be on hand to showcase SCRC’s ongoing digitization and preservation initiatives regarding wax cylinders and plastics artifacts.

What else is new in Special Collections? Meet the new members of SCRC’s curatorial team who together with SCRC archivists and audio engineers will be on hand to comment on the significance of the items and to field questions.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact scrc@syr.edu or call 315.443.2697.

 


We Remember Them opening reception on September 13

We Remember Them - The Legacy of Pan Am Flight 103 sliderAn opening reception for the the Libraries’ fall exhibition We Remember Them: The Legacy of Pan Am Flight 103 will be held on Thursday, September 13 from 4:30–6 p.m. in Special Collections Research Center gallery on the sixth floor of Bird Library.

Curated by Pan Am 103 Archivist and Assistant University Archivist Vanessa St.Oegger-Menn, this exhibition commemorates the 30-year saga of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland on December 21, 1988 that claimed the lives of all 259 individuals on board Flight 103 and 11 residents on the ground. Among the victims were 35 Syracuse University study abroad students.

Since that day, Syracuse University has been dedicated to preserving and honoring the memory of all 270 who were lost.

Through archival materials donated by the victims’ families, friends, advocates, and affected communities, the exhibition documents not only the terrorist act itself, but the lives of those lost and the ways in which they are remembered.

Whether through scholarship, public advocacy, art, or physical memorials, we ensure their lives and the lessons learned from their deaths are not forgotten.

The exhibition will be on display in Bird Library’s sixth floor gallery through June 2019. For more information, visit library.syr.edu/scrc/programs/exhibitions/exhibit/2018-09-We-Remember-Them.php.


Film preservation specialist Deborah Stoiber to give annual Brodsky Lecture on March 22 in Bird Library

Deborah Stoiber, collection manager of the Moving Image Department at the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, will give the lecture Conserving cinema’s legacy at George Eastman Museum on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 1:30­–3 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library. The lecture will be preceded by a hands-on workshop, Film Inspection and Identification, from 9:30–11:30 a.m. also in Bird Library. The lecture is open to the public, however there is limited space available for the workshop; please RSVP to jschambe@syr.edu.

The event is the 2018 offering in the annual Brodsky Series for the Advancement of Library Conservation. The series is endowed through a generous gift by William J. ’65, G’ 68 and Joan Brodsky ’67, G’68 of Chicago. Beginning in 2004, the endowment has been used to sponsor programs that promote and advance knowledge of library conservation theory, practice, and application among wide audiences, both on campus and in the region. Programs will typically include lectures and workshops by prominent library conservators.

Stoiber’s lecture will provide an introduction to the George Eastman Museum’s moving image holdings. Founded by the museum’s first curator of film, James Card (1915–2000), the collection now consists of more than 28,000 titles spanning the entire history of cinema, from the early experiments of the Lumière brothers to the cinema of today. Her presentation will encompass the definitions of conservation, preservation, reconstruction, and duplication in the moving image world, and will focus on case studies on conservation practices and their application for both digital and analog media.

The interactive workshop will cover the basics of film handling, including the identification of nitrate and safety film bases, formats, and stages of decomposition.  Students will be encouraged to take photos and ask questions as they view films on workbenches.

Deborah Stoiber has worked for the George Eastman Museum for close to 20 years. She oversees 100,000 nitrate and safety motion picture reels, a large variety of video formats, along with 2,000 Technicolor dye bottles in three facilities located in and around the city of Rochester.  Her responsibilities include inspecting, accessioning, and cataloging collection material, making recommendations for de-accessioning collections, and new acquisitions.  Recent donations to the museum include an acquisition of South Asian Cinema that has created the largest collection of Indian Cinema outside of India. She is an instructor in The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation, and is the technical director of the Nitrate Picture Show, the first film festival dedicated to the conservation of 35mm film.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available for this event. For more information, or if you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Julia Chambers at jschambe@syr.edu by March 15.


Special Collections Research Center to host spring listening parties

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries, in conjunction with La Casita Cultural Center, will host two spring listening parties this month featuring recordings from the Bell Brothers Collection of Latin American and Caribbean Recordings, which contains over 15,000 45 rpm recordings. Both events are free and open to the public.

Bohemia & Bolero
Wednesday, February 14, 5-8 p.m.
La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco St., Syracuse, NY

La Casita Cultural Center will host a Latin music showcase of classic boleros and timeless love songs to warm your heart! Join us for a special night listening to great music, dance if you like, and taste some delicious tapas… and sweets!

Africa and the Music of the Caribbean
Friday, February 23, 3-4 p.m.
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library, Syracuse University

From bomba to boogaloo, salsa to soul, Africa has provided source material and inspiration for Caribbean artists throughout the centuries—and vice versa. Join us to hear the sounds of this dynamic interchange.

About the Collection
The Bell Brothers Collection of Latin American and Caribbean Recordings at Syracuse University Libraries contains over 15,000 recordings from North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean. The 45-rpm disc collection includes merengue, bolero, guaracha, chachachá, pachanga, merecumbé, seis fajardeño, bomba, plena, mambo, guaguancó, son montuno, charanga, guajira, música jíbara, danzón, and more.

Max and Joseph Bell, the owners of the Bell Music Box, a New York City record store, were avid collectors of Latin and Caribbean music. Syracuse University acquired the entire inventory of the Bell Music Box store in 1963 and recently began a major digitization project to preserve and make accessible this unique collection.

If you need an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact Julia Chambers at jschambe@syr.edu.


Charters Adult Education Grants-in-Aid available; applications due March 1, 2018

The Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) at Syracuse University Libraries invites applicants for its Alexander N. and Margaret Charters Adult Education Grants-in-Aid Program, now in its seventh year. Up to $5,000 of grants-in-aid will be awarded to researchers, scholars, and practitioners wishing to use the Charters Library collections. The actual amount of each award will depend upon the scope of the research outlined in the applicant’s proposal. Winners will be encouraged to submit copies of any scholarly output resulting from their work for inclusion in SURFACE, Syracuse University’s institutional repository.

The application deadline is March 1, 2018; winners will be notified by April 15, 2018. Grant funds must be used between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019. For information on how to apply, visit the Charters Grants-in-Aid Program website.

The Charters Library of Resources for Educators of Adults is the world’s most comprehensive collection of English-language materials in the field of adult and continuing education, and encompasses manuscript collections, books, professional journals, newsletters, audio and video recordings, photographs, and master’s theses and dissertations. Also included are the papers of individuals such as William Langner, Beverly Cassara, and the Library’s namesake, Alexander Charters, as well as the records of such pivotal organizations as Laubach Literacy International, the National University Continuing Education Association, and the Adult Education Association/American Association for Adult and Continuing Education. More information about the collections is available on the Charters Library page.

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries, home of the Charters Library, has more than 150,000 printed works and over 2,000 manuscript and archival collections. Its holdings are particularly strong in the 20th century, and include the personal papers and manuscripts of such luminaries as artist Grace Hartigan, inspirational preacher Norman Vincent Peale, author Joyce Carol Oates, photojournalist Margaret Bourke White, and industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague, as well as the records of organizations such as avant-garde publisher Grove Press. A full list of all SCRC collections is available from our website at scrc.syr.edu.


University Archives to host Pan Am Flight 103/Lockerbie Air Disaster Open Archives

To commemorate Remembrance Week 2017, the Libraries will host two Pan Am Flight 103/Lockerbie Air Disaster Open Archives sessions. Join archivist Vanessa St.Oegger-Menn for an open viewing of selected materials from the Archives.

The Archive includes paper-based materials, correspondence, government reports and legislation, photographs, artwork, audio visual material, as well as personal items that belonged to the victims.

Sessions will be held on Thursday, October 26, 2-5 p.m. and Friday, October 27, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. in the Spector Room, 608 Bird Library. All are welcome.

For more information, contact Vanessa at vlstoegg@syr.edu or 315.443.0632.


Goudy@Syracuse opening reception on October 5

An opening reception for the exhibition Goudy@Syracuse: A Legacy by Design will be held on Thursday, October 5 from 4:30–6 p.m. on the 6th floor of Bird Library, in conjunction with Orange Central.

Curated by Andrew J. Saluti, with William T. La Moy, it tells the story of the preeminent American designer and typographer Frederic W. Goudy and his long connection to Syracuse University.

Through a selection of rare books, printed ephemera, and other archival materials, as well as original sketches and markups for the 2016 Sherman typeface adopted for the University’s visual identity, this exhibition explores the impact and importance of the famed type designer and celebrates the strong historical ties and entwined legacy of Goudy and Syracuse University.

The exhibition will be on display in Bird Library’s 6th floor gallery through May 13, 2018. For more information, visit library.syr.edu/scrc/programs/exhibitions/exhibit/2017-Goudy.php.